A new sabermetric baseball statistic?

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Brandon Gomes is on to phase two of his baseball career. Ten years after being drafted out of Tulane University, the 32-year-old right-hander has moved from the mound to a player-development position. This past fall, he was hired as a pitching coordinator by the Los Angeles Dodgers.

His role is somewhat atypical, which is hardly a surprise given the team employing him. Led by Andrew Friedman, Farhan Zaidi, and Josh Byrnes, the Dodgers front office is as progressive as any in the game. They like bringing on board smart, creative people, and Gomes has a degree in Legal Studies and Finance to augment his five seasons as a Tampa Bay Rays reliever.

Gomes talked about his new job, and some of what’s being done in LA’s newly-created pitching department, late last week.

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Gomes on getting hired by the Dodgers: “After I got released [by the Cubs] in June, I spent about three or four weeks trying to find another Triple-A job. No teams showed interest, so at that...

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As analytical as Baltimore Orioles manager Buck Showalter is, even the 2014 American League Manager of the Year might scratch his head over some of these obscure baseball stats. And if he won't, chances are you will.

Abbreviated baseball stats such as AVG (batting average), BB (base on balls or walks) and AB (At bat) are common diamond terminology that even non-baseball fans should recognize. But then there are more complex, obscure stats that would throw even longtime baseball fans for a loop.

These advanced statistics come to us from the sabermetric community, which is a analytical school of thought that breaks baseball down into formulas that objectively gauge the talent of a player. For some, this is superior to the old school "eye test" that scouts used to employ. Others complain that it takes the human element out of baseball. Whatever your stance is, there's no denying that sabermetrics have become a huge part of the game, with clubs like the Oakland Athletics,...

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The Sabermetric Manifesto by David Grabiner (1994)[2] begins:

Bill James defined sabermetrics as "the search for objective knowledge about baseball." Thus, sabermetrics attempts to answer objective questions about baseball, such as "which player on the Red Sox contributed the most to the team's offense?" or "How many home runs will Ken Griffey hit next year?" It cannot deal with the subjective judgments which are also important to the game, such as "Who is your favorite player?" or "That was a great game."

It may, however, attempt to settle questions, such as, "Was Willie Mays faster than Mickey Mantle?" by establishing several possible parameters for examining speed in objective studies (how many triples each man hit, how many bases each man stole, how many times he was caught stealing) and then reaching a tentative conclusion on the basis of these individual studies.

Sabermetricians frequently question traditional measures of baseball skill. For instance,...

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sabermetrics is the analysis of baseball through objective evidence, especially baseball statistics. The term is derived from the acronym SABR, which stands for the Society for American Baseball Research. It was coined by Bill James, who was among its first proponents and has long been its most prominent and public advocate.

From David Grabiner's Sabermetric Manifesto:

Bill James defined sabermetrics as "the search for objective knowledge about baseball." Thus, sabermetrics attempts to answer objective questions about baseball, such as "which player on the

Red Sox

contributed the most to the team's offense?" or "How many home runs will

Ken Griffey, Jr.

hit next year?" It cannot deal with the subjective judgments which are also important to the game, such as "Who is your favorite player?"

It may, however, attempt to settle questions such as "Was Willie Mays faster than Mickey Mantle?" by...

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Sabermetrics are taking over baseball. This new mathematical based way of looking at how the game is played now influences how teams evaluate players and construct their rosters. The term Sabermetrics comes from the acronym SABR, which stands for the Society of American Baseball Research. Bill James coined the term and is considered by many to be the father of modern Sabermetrics.

James has defined sabermetrics as “the search for objective knowledge about baseball.” The first example of this type of thinking — before James invented the word — was probably the 1964 book Percentage Baseball by Earnshaw Cook. The baseball establishment rejected Cook’s findings and perhaps for good reason. Many of his presumably statistical backed conclusions — such as there is no such thing a platoon split — were actually incorrect and based on bad data interpretation. However he was right about other things, such as the inefficient of the sacrifice bunt.

But even if Cook’s...

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Bill James has created dozens of sabermetric statistics, and others have contributed their own metrics. Many of these statistics have several different versions, with various organizations tweaking components of the formulas. So sabermetricians may rely on different formulas, but their style of analysis, their search for objective truth, their reliance on hard data vi ewed in context -- all of these are part of sabermetrics.

Each sabermetric tool has its uses and drawbacks, but some are more commonly used than others. For example, EqA, or equivalent average, measures a player's hitting ability, accounting for factors like league averages, park effects and pitcher quality. A simplified version of EqA is calculated as:

EqA = [Hits + Total Bases + 1.5*(Walks + Hit by Pitch) + Stolen Bases][At-bats + Walks + Hit by Pitch + Caught Stealing + (Stolen Bases)/3]

Win shares is both the title of a Bill James book and the name of a sabermetric statistic that's been...

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Sabermetrics is the analysis of baseball through objective evidence, especially baseball statistics. The term is derived from the acronym SABR, which stands for the Society for American Baseball Research. It was coined by Bill James, who was among its first proponents and has long been its most prominent advocate known to the general public. A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Statistics are very important to baseball, perhaps as much as they are for cricket, and more than almost any other sport. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ... SABR redirects here; for Selectable Assault Battle Rifle (S.A.B.R.) see XM29 OICW The Society for American Baseball Research was established in Cooperstown, New York...

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ERA[1] is one of the basic stats to determine the talent of a pitcher, and it is often very good to use. Lower ERA's are considered better, and the current average ERA in Major League Baseball is around 4.50.

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Take any pitcher and calculate how many earned runs (ER) the pitcher gave up (these can be different from regular runs given up; most places with pitching statistics will show both) and how many innings he has pitched.

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Divide his earned runs by his innings pitched.

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Multiply the resulting number by nine to find the pitcher's ERA.

Example: Joe Random gave up 4 runs in 10 innings. 4/10= .4 and .4 multiplied by 9 is 3.60. Therefore, Joe Random's ERA is...

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Sabermetrics is the empirical analysis of baseball, especially baseball statistics that measure in-game activity. Sabermetricians collect and summarize the relevant data from this in-game activity to answer specific questions. The term is derived from the acronym SABR, which stands for the Society for American Baseball Research, founded in 1971. The term sabermetrics was coined by Bill James, who is one of its pioneers and is often considered its most prominent advocate and public face.[1]

Early history[edit]

Henry Chadwick, a sportswriter in New York, developed the boxscore in 1858.[2] This was the first way statisticians were able to describe the sport of baseball.[2] The creation of the boxscore has given baseball statisticians a summary of the individual and team performances for a given game.[3]David Smith founded Retrosheet in 1989, with the objective of computerizing the box score of every major league baseball game ever played, in order to more accurately...

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For the typical fan, sabermetrics doesn’t represent anything as theoretical as scientific inquiry. Rather, sabermetrics is associated with new and unfamiliar statistics. OPS is the most famous of those new stats. It’s gone from a nearly unknown statistic in the early 80s, to barely used a decade ago, to mainstream now (it even appears on Topps baseball cards). There have also been stats like Linear Weights, Runs Created, Extrapolated Runs, WAR, and so on.

I’d still argue that sabermetrics isn’t really about those statistics; rather, the statistics have been proven to be useful based on evidence that sabermetricians have uncovered. “Runs Created,” for instance, is a statistic that was created by Bill James in the late 1970s. James’ thinking went this way: a team’s job on offense is to score runs – the more runs, the better. Suppose you didn’t know how many runs a team scored, and wanted to make an estimate, based on its batting line. For instance, here’s a real team batting...

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By Scott Kendrick

Updated October 12, 2016.

Sabermetrics

Sabermetrics was coined by renowned baseball author and researcher Bill James. James and others created new statistics with which to measure players' productivity other than the traditional batting averages and ERA. It's often used to measure future productivity.

Sabermetrics is the application of statistical analysis to baseball records, especially in order to evaluate and compare the performance of individual players. Sabermetrics is derived from the acronym SABR, which stands for the Society for American Baseball Research.

Sabermetrics was born in the 1980s, grew in the 1990s, and really gained traction in the 2000s as many of baseball's front-office decision makers became disciples of some of these statistics as an alternative, objective way to evaluate players.

A Glossary of Sabermetrics Acronyms and Definitions

These are some of the widely used stats derived from...

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We're often asked, "I'd like to know more about sabermetrics, but where do I begin?"

Longtime SABR member Phil Birnbaum has authored a Guide to Sabermetric Research to help answer your questions. We're pleased to publish it at SABR.org/sabermetrics.

Birnbaum is the editor of the SABR Statistical Analysis Committee newsletter, "By the Numbers", and he can be found writing on various topics at his blog, Sabermetric Research.

First, let's go over some basics:

What is sabermetrics? As originally defined by Bill James in 1980, sabermetrics is "the search for objective knowledge about baseball". James coined the phrase in part to honor the Society for American Baseball Research. Who invented sabermetrics? Statistical analysis has been around as long as baseball has been played competitively. Long before Moneyball became a worldwide phenomenon in the 21st century and before Bill James' baseball writings gained mainstream popularity in the 1980s, Hall of Fame...
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We feature many statistics on FanGraphs, but one of the most fundamental is Weighted On-Base Average (wOBA). If you’re not familiar with the merits of wOBA in general, I invite you to head over to our full library page on it or to learn about why it’s a gateway sabermetric statistic. For our purposes, I’ll simply include the summary:

wOBA is designed to weigh the different offensive results by their actual average contribution to run scoring. Batting average treats all hits equally and ignores walks. OBP treats all times on base equally. Slugging percentage weighs hits based on the number of bases achieved but ignores walks. Adding OBP and SLG is better than any one of AVG/OBP/SLG, but it still isn’t quite right.

Hitting a single and drawing a walk are both positive outcomes, but they have a different impact on the inning. A walk always moves each runner up one base while a single could have a variety of outcomes depending on who is on base and where the ball...

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"Baseball fans love numbers. They love to swirl them around their mouths like Bordeaux wine." - Pat Conroy "Baseball fans pay more attention to numbers than CPAs." - Jim Murray

Sabermetrics is the study of baseball using statistics. The term is attributed to Bill James, the field's most celebrated author, and is derived from the acronym "SABR", for the Society for American Baseball Research.

James, who has recently parlayed his fame into a special advisory role with the Boston Red Sox, is only the most notable (and perhaps prolific) in a long list of people who have published sabermetric works of significance. James began publishing his annual Baseball Abstract books in the mid-1970s.

"I don't understand. All of a sudden, it's not just BA and Runs Scored, it's OBA. And what is it with O P S ?" - Harold Reynolds in 2004

Statistics had been part of the game since Henry Chadwick had invented basic statistical concepts in the middle of the 19th century, but until the...

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Pitching is a ridiculous thing when you stop and think about it. It quite literally taxes the human arm to its biological limits, yet demands incredible precision and relentless repetition. As a result, pitchers can be quite fickle commodities and prone to injuries and irregular career paths. Some pitchers don’t figure everything out until they’re past 30 (e.g. Randy Johnson) while others achieve dominance at an early age but are unable to maintain that level (think Scott Kazmir). All these factors makes evaluating pitchers tricky, but there is plenty of exciting work being done these days in this area, especially with Pitch f/x data.

When evaluating a pitcher, rely mostly on the golden trifecta of FIP/xFIP/tERA. Batted ball data, BABIP, homerun rates, LOB%, and rate statistics are all very important too, though, and can shed light on individual players. Scouting data is invaluable as well, although unfortunately we have very little of this publicly available for...

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By David Grabiner

I. What is sabermetrics?

Bill James defined sabermetrics as “the search for objective knowledge about baseball.” Thus, sabermetrics attempts to answer objective questions about baseball, such as “which player on the Red Sox contributed the most to the team’s offense?” or “How many home runs will Ken Griffey hit next year?” It cannot deal with the subjective judgments which are also important to the game, such as “Who is your favorite player?” or “That was a great game.”

Since statistics are the best objective record of the game available, sabermetricians often use them. Of course, a statistic is only useful if it is properly understood. Thus, a large part of sabermetrics involves understanding how to use statistics properly, which statistics are useful for what purposes, and similar things. This does not mean that you need to know a lot about mathematics to understand sabermetrics, only that you need to have some idea of how statistics can be...

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