Can a batsman hit the ball after getting bowled in a no-ball or free hit ball?

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Firstly dead ball in cricket basically means the time in between two balls. The ball being dead means the period of this ball has ended and the next ball will begin when the bowler starts his run up again. This is why they signal a dead ball when bowlers miss their run up.

Now then, as there no "dead-ball" which can be bowled, we need to understand what happens if a ball bounces twice or more.

MCC rules state that a ball may be called a no-ball if it bounces more that twice before reaching the batsman/popping crease. This means if it bounces twice it is a legal delivery. So in both cases whether bouncing twice or more if the batsman hits it, he gets the runs.

I see some people referring to Trevor Chappell's underarm ball.

Actually, as per rules prevalent then, an underarm ball was a perfectly legal delivery. Unsporting but legal. And therefore Trevor was right according to the laws. However, subsequently MCC and ICC banned underarm bowling and the rule...

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In cricketing terms, a bump ball is one which is played into the ground and it rises up to to a fair enough height, making fielders and sometimes umpires believe, that it is a catch. It happens because the ball is hit just when it is about to rise up after pitching on the turf. So there just a little time lag in between the ball pitching and it being hit by the bat, may be less than half a second. Thus it is sometimes not possible for umpires to give their decisions straightway. They ask the TV umpire(or the third umpire) for help.

Hit wicket is when a batsman dislodges the bails(or the stumps, which happens rarely), no matter how(may be with his bat, legs, gloves, helmet, etc.), while attempting a shot or completing the follow-through of the shot. The only thing that matters is whether the ball was in play, or was dead. If it's in play then he's out, or else not. Further, he isn't out hit wicket while taking a run and bumping into the stumps(accidentally).

So, there...

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Advantage gainedEdit

The opportunity afforded by a free hit ball enables the batsman to play a more powerful shot without the fear of getting out by the most common methods (caught or leg before wicket). The suspension of these opportunities for being out result in the delivery immediately after a foot-fault no ball being termed a free hit. The fault lies with the fielding side, and the advantage is to the batting side. Also,if the ball did hit the stumps, the batsman could afford to steal single runs (a bye) because the ball is normally considered a dead ball.

If the bowler delivers the ball without some part of his front foot (either grounded or raised) behind the popping crease, or if his back foot does not 'land within and not touching the return crease', this delivery is ruled a no ball (Law 24.5 of The Laws of Cricket).

Fielding restrictionsEdit

The fielding team is not allowed to change the field on the free hit ball, if the same batsman...

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Big Bash League is one of the best source of Entertainment for all the lover of Cricket. There are many hard hitters playing in Big Bash League. Almost every season of Big Bash League is very exciting for the viewers. People enjoy the sixes and fours in Big Bash League.

In the previous season of the Big Bash League batsman created a unique record by hitting 20 runs on 1 ball. The bowler commentators and all the players were shocked at this. The batsman hit fastest fifty after hitting 20 runs in 1 ball. The sixes that he smashed was also very huge.

Birt was the batter here and poor McKay who was bowling well this time could not get thing right. The first ball was good but it was on the leg side and Birt just hit this one from the middle of the bat over the deep backward square leg for a huge six.

This was a massive hit and he way Birt played this one was absolutely brilliant. It was a length ball and Birt bent his front knee and picked it up. It was a pick up...

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Everybody agrees that the most popular sport in the world today is soccer. But which is the second most popular? Is it basketball? Maybe rugby? Tennis perhaps? No, as you've probably guessed by now, the answer seems to be cricket. The reason for this is that cricket is the number one sport in many countries with huge populations, such as India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. It is popular in many other countries as well, including the U.K., Australia, South Africa, Sri Lanka and New Zealand. Cricket is, like baseball, a "bat and ball" game in which bowlers "bowl" the ball and batsmen try to hit "shots" with a bat and score runs for their team. As in baseball, batsmen are "out" if their shot is caught, or if they don't get to a "safe haven" in time when they're making runs. What is very different, however, is the time taken to play the game. In cricket, a single game in the traditional "Test match" format can take five full days to complete! But thankfully there are shorter formats for...

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No-ball delivery:

When a bowler over-steps, resulting in a no-ball, and the batsman's wicket has been disturbed with the ball going to the boundary, then 5 runs are awarded to the batting side. Five runs is split as one for overstepping and four for the boundary. All these 5 runs go into the extras (no-ball) column. However, if the ball touches the bat/glove before hitting the stumps and then goes to the boundary, 1 run is added in the extras column for the no-ball and 4 runs are added to the batsman's score. Either way, the batting side get 5 runs.

More details, including the excerpt below, can be found here and here.

13 - Runs resulting from a No ball - how scored
The one run penalty shall be scored as a No ball extra. Any runs completed by the batsmen or any boundary allowance shall be credited to the striker if the ball has been struck by the bat; otherwise they shall also be scored as No ball extras.

Free-hit delivery:

The...

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This situation comes under the law 37 (Obstructing the field). (emphasis mine)

Either batsman is out Obstructing the field if he wilfully attempts to obstruct or distract the fielding side by word or action. In particular, but not solely, it shall be regarded as obstruction and either batsman will be out Obstructing the field if while the ball is in play and after the striker has completed the act of playing the ball, as defined in Law 33.1, he wilfully strikes the ball with

(i) a hand not holding the bat, unless this is in order to avoid injury. See also Law 33.2 (Not out Handled the ball).

(ii) any other part of his person or with his bat. See also Law 34 (Hit the ball twice).

So in the given situation once the ball is bowled (here either no ball or free hit), it is in play irrespective of the ball touches the bat until the umpire declares it a dead 1. So if the batsman hit the ball after he gets bowled, he is actually obstructing the field because...

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In the sport of cricket a No ball is a penalty against the fielding team, usually as a result of an illegal delivery by the bowler. For most cricket games, especially amateur games, the definition of all forms of No ball is from the MCC Laws of Cricket,[1] although youth cricket often has stricter rules on beamers, and international cricket has stricter rules on beamers, but laxer rules on bouncers.

The delivery of a No ball results in one run – two under some Regulations – to be added to the batting team's score, and an additional ball must be bowled. In addition, the number of ways in which the batsman can be given out is reduced except for run out. In shorter competition cricket, a batsman receives a 'free hit' on the ball after any kind of No ball (see below). This means the batsman can freely hit one ball with no danger of being out in most ways.

No balls due to overstepping the crease are not uncommon, especially in short form cricket, and fast bowlers tend to...

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In your question there are different situation as follows -

Q1 - If a batsman is standing at his normal stance inside crease and the bowler bowls (over the waist when crossing the batsman) a beamer and hits the stumps will he be out. This could happen if the batsman is say very short 4.5 ft and bowler is tall say 8ft.

Q2 - If the batsman is normally standing outside his crease (before bowler starts his run-up) and then gets a beamer which crashes into the stumps will he be out.

Q3 - If the batsman is within his crease before run-up and charges the bowler as he delivers but gets a beamer which bowls him, will he be declared out.

Q4 - If the batsman is within his crease before bowler delivers and gets a beamer, what happens when he takes an evasion action by jumping out of his crease and the ball hits the stumps, will he be out. What would also happen that while taking evasive action it hits his body over waist and crashes into the stumps, will he be declared...

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In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as the fielding side taking a wicket and/or the batting side losing a wicket). At this point a batsman must discontinue batting and leave the field permanently for the innings. A bowling team dismisses (or bowls out) the entire batting team by dismissing 10 of the 11 players (assuming player(s) from the batting team have not retired hurt or are absent). As the players bat in pairs, when only one person is undismissed, it is not possible for them to bat any longer.

Once dismissed, a batsman cannot score any more runs in that innings. Thus dismissal is often the best way to control the runs scored in an innings, and prevent the batting side from either achieving their target score or posting a large total for the fielding side to follow in the next innings.

Additionally, in Test cricket it is usually necessary for a side fielding last to have dismissed ten players of the opposing team in...

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Free hit is a cricket term, relevant in One Day Internationals and Twenty20 matches. When a bowler bowls a no ball (overstepping with either foot), in the immediate next ball the batsman cannot be ruled out in any dismissal modes other than those applicable for a no-ball, namely run out, handled the ball, hit the ball twice and obstructing the field. Additionally, if the ball is delivered full toss (above the waist) the batsman receives a free hit. It came into international cricket in October 2007.

Advantage gained[edit]

The opportunity afforded by a free hit ball enables the batsman to play a more powerful shot without the fear of getting out by the most common methods (caught or leg before wicket). The suspension of these opportunities for being out result in the delivery immediately after a foot-fault no ball being termed a free hit. The fault lies with the fielding side, and the advantage is to the batting side. Also,if the ball did hit the stumps, the...

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In the event of a no ball for bowler overstepping, a free hit is allowed. in a free hit, the batsman will not be out by any means except by run out.

Free Hit rule is applicable in T20 and ODI only and not in test matches.

Clarification given by ICC regarding free hit is reproduced below:

The free hit in ODIs applies to all foot fault no balls and not just front foot no balls, the ICC today confirmed.

A free hit will apply to the next delivery after a bowler either oversteps with his front foot or if his back foot cuts or does not land within the return crease.

The playing condition reads as follows:

24.2 Free Hit after a foot-fault no ball... the delivery following a no ball called for a foot fault (Law 24.5) shall be a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it. If the delivery for the free hit is not a legitimate delivery (any kind of no ball or a wide ball) then the next delivery will become a free hit for whichever batsman is facing...

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The free hit in ODIs applies to all foot fault no balls and not just front foot no balls, the ICC today confirmed.

A free hit will apply to the next delivery after a bowler either oversteps with his front foot or if his back foot cuts or does not land within the return crease.

The playing condition reads as follows:

24.2 Free Hit after a foot-fault no ball... the delivery following a no ball called for a foot fault (Law 24.5) shall be a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it. If the delivery for the free hit is not a legitimate delivery (any kind of no ball or a wide ball) then the next delivery will become a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it.

For any free hit, the striker can be dismissed only under the circumstances that apply for a no ball, even if the delivery for the free hit is called wide ball.

Field changes are not permitted for free hit deliveries unless there is a change of striker (the provisions of clause 41.2...

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A no-ball is a delivery which does not count as one of the bowler's six legitimate balls in one over.

The fielding team are penalised one run every time a no-ball is bowled, which is added to the extras tally of the batting team.

The extra run will also be added to the bowler's overall figures.

The umpire will call a no ball by raising an arm at shoulder height and the fielding team must bowl another legitimate delivery.

If the batsman scores off a no ball, the runs will be added to their individual score.

There are a couple of anomalies, though.

In domestic 40-over cricket, a no-ball concedes two runs. In Twenty20 cricket, a no-ball is followed by a 'free hit', a delivery from which the batsman can not be bowled or caught out, but can still be run out.

They cannot be dismissed off a no ball - only except if the batsman is run out.

The umpire will call a no ball if:

• The heel of the bowler's front foot lands on or in...

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