Can the striker be dismissed, Caught, if the ball is deflected off an umpire? [duplicate]

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Is it possible to dismiss both the batsmen in ground(ie,by a catch and a run out)?

No. It is not possible to dismiss both batsmen on the same delivery. Only one batsman can be legally dismissed. In the event of both being dismissed on the same delivery, the batsman dismissed first goes back to the pavilion while the other continues with his/her innings.

Is "Hit the ball twice" out?

According to the Laws of Cricket (Law 34 - as stated below), if done intentionally, then yes, it is out.

Law 34 (Hit the ball twice)
1. Out Hit the ball twice

The striker is out Hit the ball twice if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he willfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. See 3 below and Laws 33 (Handled the ball) and 37 (Obstructing the field).

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Cricket - How To Get Out


(h2g2 - Cricket - How To Get Out)

The Basics

Before we tell you how to get yourself out, we'll need to know some basics.

Appealing

A batsman cannot be given out unless a member of the fielding side 'appeals' to the umpire and, as Law 27.4 says, a simple shout of 'how's that?' will do perfectly. Umpires must respond to each appeal, either by raising a finger above the head to show the batsman's innings is over or by a verbal 'not out'. The fielding captain may withdraw the appeal if he is feeling generous, and umpires have the right to change their decision 'providing that such an alteration is made promptly1'. A batsman can also 'walk' without waiting for the umpire to give him out, and this behaviour is generally encouraged - a man who faintly nicks the ball to the wicketkeeper and walks off, knowing he is guilty, is generally better respected than one who hangs around waiting for the dreaded finger.
Umpires...

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In cricket, an umpire (from the Old French nompere meaning not a peer, i.e. not a member of one of the teams, impartial) is a person who has the authority to make judgements on the cricket field, according to the laws of cricket. Besides making decisions about legality of delivery, appeals for wickets and general conduct of the game in a legal manner, the umpire also keeps a record of the deliveries and announces the completion of an over.

A cricket umpire is not to be confused with the referee who usually presides only over international matches and makes no decisions affecting the outcome of the game.

Overview[edit]

Traditionally, cricket matches have two umpires on the field, one standing at the end where the bowler delivers the ball (Bowler's end), and one directly opposite the facing batsman (usually, but not always, at square leg). However, in the modern game, there may be more than two umpires; for example Test Matches have four: two on-field...

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In the sport of cricket, leg before wicket (LBW) is one of the ways in which a batsman can be dismissed. An umpire will rule a batsman out LBW under a series of circumstances which primarily include the ball striking the batsman's body (usually the leg) when it would otherwise have continued on to hit the batsman's wicket (here referring to the stumps and bails). The LBW rule is designed to prevent a batsman simply using his body to prevent the ball from hitting the wicket (and so avoid being bowled out) rather than using his bat to do so.

Despite the word leg in leg before wicket, the rule applies if the ball hits the batsman on any part of his body, except for the glove of a hand in contact with the bat (which is considered part of the bat).

Origins

LBW was not included in the 1744 version of the Laws of Cricket. It first appeared in the 1774 version, which stated: The STRIKER is out if..... Or if the striker puts his leg before the wicket with a design to...

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An Explanation of Cricket

Contents

Cricket is a team sport for two teams of eleven players each. A formal game of cricket can last anything from an afternoon to several days.

Although the game play and rules are very different, the basic concept of cricket is similar to that of baseball. Teams bat in successive innings and attempt to score runs, while the opposing team fields and attempts to bring an end to the batting team's innings. After each team has batted an equal number of innings (either one or two, depending on conditions chosen before the game), the team with the most runs wins.

(Note: In cricket-speak, the word "innings" is used for both the plural and the singular. "Inning" is a term used only in baseball.)

Cricket Ball: Hard, cork and string ball, covered with leather. A bit like a baseball (in size and hardness), but the leather covering is thicker and joined in two hemispheres, not in a tennis ball pattern. The seam is thus like an...
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Learn more about Dismissal (cricket)

In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as taking a wicket).

[edit] Ways of getting out

A batsman can be dismissed in a number of ways, the most common being bowled, caught, leg before wicket (LBW), stumped and run out. Much rarer are hit wicket, hit the ball twice, handled the ball, obstructing the field and timed out.

The bowler only "gets credit" for a wicket if the batsman is out bowled, LBW, caught, stumped, or hit wicket. If the ball is a no ball then the batsman cannot be out in any of these ways. The batsman can, however, be out run out, handled the ball, hit the ball twice, obstructing the field, or timed out on any ball.

[edit] Law 2.9(b) : Retired

If any batsman leaves the field of play without the Umpire's consent for any reason other than injury or incapacity, he may resume the innings only with the consent of the opposing captain. If he...

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With spinners, many of the facing batsmen with try to smash it for six, usually over the spinner's head. Try placing a fielder at deep mid-on or deep mid-off. When the batsman mistimes the shot, the fielder can take a nice, easy catch into the bread basket. Also, place fielders deep if the batsman smashes it elsewhere (e.g., deep square leg, fine leg, point and cover). Don't place all of your fielders near the boundary, scatter some up close near the wicky because the batsman could block some and take easy singles, and, every once an awhile the spinner bowls the perfect ball and the batter nicks the ball to the slips or silly mid-on and that gives you many wickets for your...

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Many people are astonished at the number of ways it is possible to be dismissed in cricket. Actually the number goes as high as to eleven. Before getting down to the main methods of dismissal it is important to specify that no batsman can be given out unless a member of the fielding side 'appeals' to the umpire and, as Law 27.4 says, shouts 'how's that?'


1. BOWLED

Law 30 states – the striker is out Bowled if his wicket is put down by a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball, even if it first touches his bat or person.


2. CAUGHT

Law 32 states that the batsman is out 'Caught' if a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a no-ball, touches his bat and is subsequently held by a fielder as a fair catch before it touches the ground. The ball can be caught in a fielder's clothing or the wicket-keeper's pads, but if it is lodged in or deflects off a protective helmet worn by a fielder, this is not considered fair and the batsman is not...

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In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as taking a wicket). For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Cricket batsman A batsman in the sport of cricket is, depending on context: Any player in the act of batting. ...

Ways of getting out

A batsman can be dismissed in a number of ways, the most common being bowled, caught, leg before wicket (LBW), stumped and run out. Much rarer are hit wicket, hit the ball twice, handled the ball, obstructing the field and timed out. In the sport of cricket, leg before wicket (LBW) is one of the ways in which a batsman can be dismissed. ...


The bowler only "gets credit" for a wicket if the batsman is out bowled, LBW, caught, stumped, or hit wicket. If the ball is a no ball then the batsman cannot be out in any of these ways. The batsman can, however, be out run out, handled the ball, hit the ball twice, obstructing the field, or timed out on any ball. ...

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as the fielding side taking a wicket and/or the batting side losing a wicket). At this point a batsman must discontinue batting and leave the field permanently for the innings.

Role

Once dismissed, a batsman cannot score any more runs in that innings. Thus dismissal is the best way to control the runs scored in an innings, and prevent the batting side from either achieving their target score or posting a large total for the fielding side to follow in the next innings.

Additionally, in Test cricket it is necessary for a side fielding last to have dismissed ten players of the opposing team in their final innings to achieve victory.

Adjudication

By convention, dismissal decisions are handled primarily by the players - thus if the dismissal is obvious the batsman will voluntarily leave the field without the umpire needing...

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In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as the fielding side taking a wicket and/or the batting side losing a wicket). At this point a batsman must discontinue batting and leave the field permanently for the innings. A bowling team dismisses (or bowls out) the entire batting team by dismissing 10 of the 11 players (assuming player(s) from the batting team have not retired hurt or are absent). As the players bat in pairs, when only one person is undismissed, it is not possible for them to bat any longer.

Once dismissed, a batsman cannot score any more runs in that innings. Thus dismissal is often the best way to control the runs scored in an innings, and prevent the batting side from either achieving their target score or posting a large total for the fielding side to follow in the next innings.

Additionally, in Test cricket it is usually necessary for a side fielding last to have dismissed ten players of the opposing team in...

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Good question!

Wikipedia defines caught as

A batsman is out caught if a fielder catches the ball fully within the field of play without it bouncing once the ball has touched the striker's bat or glove holding the bat. If a batsman could be given out caught or by any other method except bowled, 'caught' takes precedence.

Law 32 of the Laws of cricket has sub-clauses defining fair-catches, one of which is:

3(e). A fielder catches the ball after it has touched an umpire, another fielder or the other batsman.

So, to answer your various scenarios,

If the ball hits the arm pad of the batsman and is caught by the fielder.

No. this will not be a dismissal as it has neither touched the the batsman's bat nor the glove holding the bat.

If the ball hits the leg pad first, then hits the bat and is finally caught by the fielder.

Yes. This is considered a legal catch and the batsman is dismissed.

If the ball hits the bat...

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1. Out LBW

The striker is out LBW in the circumstances set out below.

A Batsman is given LBW based on below rules .

(a) The bowler delivers a ball, not being a No ball,

and (b) the ball, if it is not intercepted full pitch, pitches in line between wicket and wicket or on the off side of the striker’s wicket,

and (c) the ball not having previously touched his bat, the striker intercepts the ball, either full pitch or after pitching, with any part of his person,

and (d) the point of impact, even if above the level of the bails,

either (i) is between wicket and wicket,

or (ii) if the striker has made no genuine attempt to play the ball with his bat, is either between wicket and wicket or outside the line of the off stump.

and (e) but for the interception, the ball would have hit the wicket.

2. Interception of the ball

(a) In assessing points (c), (d) and (e) in 1 above, only the first interception is to be...

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In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as taking a wicket).

Ways of getting out

A batsman can be dismissed in a number of ways, the most common being bowled, caught, leg before wicket (LBW), stumped and run out. Much rarer are hit wicket, hit the ball twice, handled the ball, obstructing the field and timed out.

The bowler only "gets credit" for a wicket if the batsman is out bowled, LBW, caught, stumped, or hit wicket. If the ball is a no ball then the batsman cannot be out in any of these ways. The batsman can, however, be out run out, handled the ball, hit the ball twice, obstructing the field, or timed out on any ball.

Law 2.9(b) : Retired

If any batsman leaves the field of play without the Umpire's consent for any reason other than injury or incapacity, he may resume the innings only with the consent of the opposing captain. If he fails to resume his innings, he recorded ...

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Cricket Umpire Q+A is where you can read the answers to cricket umpiring questions that have been submitted to the experienced umpire who manages this umpiring web page.

Q1: A nervous bowler delivers a series of wides and no balls. After ten deliveries, only two are legitimate. The team captain wants to replace him with another bowler to complete the over. Should you allow this?

A: Not unless the bowler suffers an injury or is suspended by the umpire.

Q2: An injured batter who has been using a runner forgets about the runner and takes off for a quick single. He makes his ground before the stumps are broken but the runner does not. The fielding team appeals for the run-out. What is your decision?

A: The injured batter is out on appeal. Both the batter and the runner must have made their ground.

Q3: The wicketkeeper knocks a bail off the wicket while waiting to gather the ball. Both batters are stranded at the other end of the pitch....

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