Could someone explain the “let” rule in squash?

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The electoral college protects minority states interests from being bullied by the large states. The founding fathers feared a majority interest would dominate the political scene and answer to nobody. This was their way of providing checks and balances against a dictatorship, a tyrannical majority as they called it. The origin of the electoral college was rooted in the idea that a presidential candidate must be representative of a plurality of the 50 states, not just a simple majority in some states, which can be have a tendency to be very majority-oriented and therefore tyrannical. The Electoral College protects multiple interests. Otherwise, the majority would always win, and dominate policy. That's not a true united states. See, the electoral college protects the smaller states (such as Ohio!) from becoming totally irrelevant and practically voiceless. It reweighs some individual votes, and you may somehow feel that votes have been compromised, unfairly. But think about...

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Are you uncertain about some aspects of squash rules? Take a look at this post where I review everything you need to know - no uncertainty anymore!

Many beginners struggle even with the basic squash rules – they make mistakes, alter the gameplay and the result is a total mess. So let`s dig right into it and explain how the squash gameplay is organised.

The court
The squash court consists of four walls and a floor (take a look at the picture for better view):

• The front wall is the largest and you can see three horizontal lines on it.
Л The middle one is called service line and is only used when serving while the remaining two are taken into consideration during the entire game.
Л The topmost line (the out line) descends along the side walls and all balls struck above or on it are considered out.
Л The bottom line indicates the top of a tin which is 43 centimeters-high metal section. If struck, the ball is out so...

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2. The Scoring

A match is the best of 3 or 5 games.

Each game is played to 11 points. The player who scores 11 points first wins the game except that if the score reaches 10-all, the game continues until one player leads by two points.

Either player may score points (PAR – point–a–rally). The server, on winning a rally, scores a point and retains the service; the receiver, on winning a rally, scores a point and becomes the server.

3. The Warm Up

Before the start of a match, the two players are allowed up to 5 minutes...

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We all say things sometimes that aren’t exactly “politically correct.” I believe this is just part of human nature. But as the 21st century wears on, people are realizing the effects of their words more than ever. One area this doesn’t quite seem to be occurring fast enough though, is with stigma against mental illness. This can be a particular problem in the workplace because while friends may care enough to watch what they say, co-workers and supervisors don’t always “get it.”

Sometimes, it comes in funny lines and jokes that seem harmless.

My supervisor very kindly offered to get root beer floats for a difficult meeting, and a co-worker suggested we top them with “Xanax sprinkles.”

One co-worker reminded another co-worker to pack her “Prozac” for a stressful vacation, referring to chocolate.

One of the managers in my office said one day that he may just decide to check himself into a psych ward if things didn’t settle down soon.

During a...

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To a beginner, the rules of squash may seem confusing. Two of the points about which newcomers often have questions are the let and the stroke, and the differences between them.

Definitions of Let and Stroke

According to the HobbyStop website, a let describes a rally in which there is no clear winner. A stroke describes a situation in which a player's swing to the ball suffers directly from interference, resulting in a point (or stroke) for the swinging player, states the SquashClub website. Both can be related to interference, but have differences and are handled differently within the rules.

Rules Related to Let

Let occurs when play is stopped and the score point in question is played over again. According to the University of Texas at Dallas, situations leading to let include:

If a ball that is in play touches a player, that player will lose the point, with the exception that "the point shall be replayed as a let if the return except for...

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Squash players can sometimes be irrational.

This is especially true when it comes to let calls. What one player claims as a definite let, appear to others as a fishing exercise. Clearly, the issue is not confined to club squash. Many argue that until the game rids itself of lame lets, it will never gain the kind of media coverage and popularity it deserves. As the championship matches at Club Meadowvale wound down, I decided to have some fun and did a quick video survey of random squash players who were milling around at the club. I asked everyone one simple question – Should there be lets in squash?

Here’s what they said.

As you can see, each player has a different take on why lets should or should not be allowed in squash. Some had logic behind their choice; others, less so. The result was fairly even with the “no let” camp edging out the “yes” camp by one. This came as a surprise since the club has never offered a no-let format for the players in the house...

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This is a brief summary of squash rules & scoring — just enough detail to get you playing!

If you plan on participating in squash leagues or tournaments, or just find yourself becoming more involved with squash, you should read the complete rulebook.

Jump to: Scoring | Warmup | Serve | Playing a point | Interference

Download the complete rules: Squash Singles Rules [PDF]

Squash Scoring

The squash scoring rules are pretty simple. Usually a match will be in a “best-of-five” games format. So to win a squash match, you must win three games.

Each game is played to 11 points. The first player to 11 wins the game. If the game becomes tied at 10-10, it’s “win by 2”. The first person to go ahead by 2 points wins the game.

Squash is point-a-rally (or PAR), which means you win a point every time you win a rally (unlike, say volleyball where you must be serving to win a point). Squash used to be played to 9 points and you could only win a point...

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Can Someone Explain The 53 Suitcases Scandal To Me? by (m): 10:02am On Oct 16, 2006

I've looked for it quite a bit on the web, but I don't quite understand.

Thanks

Re: Can Someone Explain The 53 Suitcases Scandal To Me? by (m): 9:36pm On Nov 25, 2006

Hi,

I'll try my best.

It was way back in the day. Buhari was the Head of State, his sidekick was the military hardliner Tunde Idiagabon. The govt decided to change the currency, I can't really remember the reason why, maybe to revamp the economy. Ialso think they wanted to force the politicains they had deposed to come back with their stolen loot (I may be wrong about this, all of this happened circa 1984). Anyways, I definitely know that the Naira was trading at N1.50 to the...

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Ruling on lets and strokes can be one of the most challenging parts of the referee’s responsibilities. The World Squash Federation describes the rules regarding lets and strokes in great detail, and players should be familiar with these rules. The flow chart below summarizes how a referee should decide on lets and strokes. The College Squash Association recommends that a copy of this chart be provided on the clipboard with the score sheet for each match (click on the chart to enlarge):

Note: When the striker is asking for a let, the striker should stop their swing and not hit the ball. It is bad form to ask in the first instance for a stroke because the request for a let implies a request for the stroke. Players are encouraged to offer the stroke if they know a stroke is warranted.

BEST EFFORT LET and FISHING FOR STROKES

College coaches and players should be particularly aware of two rules: the “best effort let” and “fishing for strokes.”

Best...

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Do you play squash under the rules?

Are you uncertain about some aspects of the rules?

Take a look at this post where I review everything you need to know – no uncertainty anymore!

Many beginners struggle even with the basic squash rules – they make mistakes, alter the gameplay and the result is a total mess. So let`s dig right into it and explain how the squash gameplay is organised.

The court

The squash court consists of four walls and a floor (take a look at the picture for better view):

The front wall is the largest and you can see three horizontal lines on it. The middle one is called service line and is only used when serving while the remaining two are taken into consideration during the entire game. The topmost line (the out line) descends along the side walls and all balls struck above or on it are considered out. The bottom line indicates the top of a tin which is 43 centimeters-high metal section. If struck, the ball is out so...
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I have searched threads and read the sticky rules and sill have following questions. If some kind soul can let me know the answers to the following questions, it will be greatly appreciated.

1) What are the rules around sharing photography related content? I see good bit of group buy threads but not a whole lot of sharing. I also read in one of the thread the CGPeers does not share photography stuff. Don't remember the thread now.

2) Does CGPeers allow creating a photography fan club to share and/or perform big group buys? What are the rules around it? Does the OP decides the rules of group buy i.e. every group buy can be opened for sharing or closed for sharing and I see them closed for sharing i.e. after the group buy nobody shares?

3) Looking at post # 50 in http://forum.cgpersia.com/f21/mega-g...ion-3-a-79513/ with direct link to post http://forum.cgpersia.com/f21/mega-g...13/#post823944, what are the rules around creating a club with some kind of token...

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Scoring
All PSA World Tour matches, across both men’s and women’s competitions, are played using a best of 5 games format. Each game is played with ‘point a rally’ scoring to 11 (PAR 11). If the score in a game is tied at 10-10, play continues until a player wins by 2 clear points.

Scoring A Point
In PARS, the winner of a rally always receives a point, regardless of whether they were the server or returner. A point is earned when the opponent either; fails to play a shot before the ball bounces for a second time (double-bounce), hits the ball on or above the market ‘out lines’ or hits the ‘tin’ – the hard strip on the front wall which acts similar to the net in tennis. The tin is normally made of metal and produces a hollow sound when hit to indicate to the players and referee when a shot is down.

Points can also be won or lost when a physical obstruction occurs on the court between two players – see the ‘Let, No Let and Stroke’ explanation...

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the 'NO JUDGEMENT' time violation rule tennis abuse 2013 compilation...

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Only available on StudyMode

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WORLD SQUASH
SINGLES RULES
2014
(INCLUDING APPENDICES 1-9) APPROVED BY THE WORLD SQUASH FEDERATION
Effective 1st January 2014

ENGLAND SQUASH & RACKETBALL THE NATIONAL SQUASH CENTRE

SPORTCITY
ROWSLEY STREET
MANCHESTER
M11 3FF
Tel: 0161 231 4499
Fax: 0161 231 4231

email: enquiries@englandsquashandracketball.com

SQUASH - SINGLES RULES

Table of Contents

1THE GAME1
2SCORING1
3OFFICIALS1
4THE WARM-UP2
5THE SERVE2
6THE PLAY3
7INTERVALS3
8INTERFERENCE4
9BALL HITTING A PLAYER6
10APPEALS6
11THE BALL7
...

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Rules of squash

Master the basic rules of squash below. Looking for the full rules? Download the single rules and double rules.

Squash equipment

Squash is played between two players on a squash court each using a standard racket, and a ball approved by England Squash.

Scoring

Matches are the best of 3 or 5 games, at the option of the competition organiser. Each game is point a rally scoring to 11 (PAR 11). If the score in a game is tied at 10-10, a player must win by 2 clear points.

How to win points

Points can be scored by either player. When a player fails to serve or to return the ball, in accordance with the rules, the opponent wins the point. When the Receiver wins a point, they become the Server and add one to their score.

Service

a) The right to serve is decided by the spin of a racket or coin. Thereafter the Server continues to serve until they lose the point; the opponent then becomes the Server.

b)...

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Originally Posted by

Gothmog

For me, this takes a lot of fun out of playing, if I know that my character is nigh invulnerable and can mow through hordes of "lesser beings". I think the GM was trying to go for a "heroic" feel to his game, but IMO heroes are not heroic because they can kill hordes of enemies, but for their actions and beliefs.

I'm with you. A hero is a hero because he does hard stuff, not because he does easy stuff. So making something that would be hard in reality easy in the game makes the game less heroic, not more.

Mooks are from Chinese (Hong Kong) cinema, and there they work because the heroes do impressive-looking flashy stuff to deal with them. It doesn't look like a slugger beating up on a lot of teenagers, although the results are the same. But RPGs don't have the advantage of the visuals.

So my impression of 'mook rules' is they work to exactly the extent that they remind fans of kung fu movies of kung fu movies, and no...

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I wouldn't consider that image to be a strong rule-of-thirds. There isn't much that falls right on a third line or intersection. His body is almost centered on the right third line, but the balance is really to the right more. The muscle of his underarm runs almost exactly from the top line to the bottom line, so that is an element.

This isn't a bad thing. A lot of my images don't follow the thirds closely either. I don't think it's the best example for someone learning, is all. I do like the image.

Here are a couple that I think have pretty tight rule-of-thirds.

In this one, her body follows the bottom third line to the lower-right intersection, then up the right third line, which is right in the middle of her torso. While her feet are lower the the botttom third and her thighs are higher, it's a pretty even balance. This would have been an even stronger thirds image if I had left the original crop where her right foot and her head were right on the...

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The basic rules of squash are fairly simple. First the winner of the toss gets to choose which side they want to serve from and alternates sides until they lose a point. The toss is typically done by spinning the racquet, with one player guessing whether the racquet will land up or down based on the direction of the logo at the end of the grip. The ball can hit any number of walls ( i.e sidewall, backwall ) but must eventually hit the front wall before bouncing on the floor. A rally ( the exchange of shots ) ends when one of the following occurs:

Interference resulting in a stroke, i.e. point to the obstructed player.

The serve is done by having at least one foot in the service box, then hitting the ball to the front wall, above the service line and having it bounce in the opposite quarter-court. The receiver can stand anywhere as long as they do not interfere with the server. Only one serve is allowed. There is no second serve as in tennis.

Your opponent has the...

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The Rules of Squash[back home]

THE RULES OF WORLD SQUASH SINGLES

THE GAME THE SCORE POINTS THE SERVICE THE PLAY GOOD RETURN LET STROKES HITTING AN OPPONENT WITH THE BALL FURTHER ATTEMPTS TO HIT THE BALL APPEALS INTERFERENCE LETS THE BALL THE WARM UP CONTINUITY OF PLAY CONDUCT ON COURT CONTROL OF A MATCH DUTIES OF A MARKER DUTIES OF A REFEREE PROPOSED 1997 SINGLES RULES

1. THE GAME

The game of Squash is played between two players, each using a specified racket, with a specified ball, and in a court constructed to WSF specified dimensions.

2. THE SCORE

A match shall consist of the best of three or five games at the option of the organisers of the competition. Each game is to nine points, in that the player who scores nine points wins the game, except that, on the score being called eight-all for the first time, the receiver shall choose before the next service is delivered to continue that...

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FAQ Index
Ask A Question

Categories:

Category: 07. Turning

Can you please explain the TURNING rule?
When a player is turning around to hit without calling 'turning' can the opponent ask for a let?
I have heard that 'turning' has been outlawed.
In the Idiot's Guide, asking for a let after turning is now a no-let (with a stroke for your opponent if you hit him). In the Abbreviated Rules, it states that a let is the recommended course of action if you ask after turning. Can you explain this.
If the player turns his body around to follow the ball, but the ball actually passes between his legs is it still considered turning?
I note the rules of 2001 allow turning, but I have heard that i the last 12 months this has changed and there should now be no turning. Is this correct?
The turing rule states that if a player, after having turned, hits the non-striker, he/she loses the point (stroke against the striker). Does this apply...
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Squash is a fast-moving game that requires skill, speed and supreme fitness.

The ball can reach speeds of up to 170mph and players can burn off up to 1000 calories per hour of squash - higher than most other sports.

It began in the 19th century and was originally called squash racquets, to distinguish it from the game of racquets.

Harrow School, just outside London, is credited as the game's birthplace - when young pupils who couldn't compete with older boys for space on the proper racquets courts invented their own version using a rubber ball instead of a hard one.

RULES

The basic principle is to keep hitting the ball against the front wall until your opponent cannot get it back any more.

Players must keep one foot in the service box as they serve.

The ball must hit the front wall between the service line and the out line, and land in the area behind the short line on the opposite side of the court.

For the remainder of...

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By Rod Symington, WSF Referees and Rules Committee

There is perhaps no other aspect of the Rules that is as misunderstood as the concept of “fair view.” Because it is so misunderstood, players rarely invoke the Rule.

In fact, because the Rule is so widely misunderstood and so rarely used, there have been several attempts over the years to delete the Rule—but it has always survived.

“Fair view” is one of the four “freedoms” that the striker is entitled to. Most players are fully familiar with the other three freedoms: the requirement to give the striker direct access to the ball; the space to make a normal swing; and the room to hit the ball directly to any part of the entire front wall. If you do not give your opponent all of these three freedoms, you could lose the point.

But most players also do not understand what it means to give your opponent “fair view” of the ball.

After hitting a boast, Ramy Ashour (L) followed his shot and came up behind...

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