Do the laws of cricket allow running on the last ball, even after winning?

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Group A: Bahrain U19 v Malaysia U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 27, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group B: HK U19 v UAE U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 27, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group B: Oman U19 v Thailand U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 27, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group A: Qatar U19 v S'pore U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 27, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group A: Bahrain U19 v S Arabia U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 28, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group B: HK U19 v Kuwait U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 28, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group B: Kuwait U19 v Oman U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 29, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

Group A: Malaysia U19 v Qatar U19 at Kuala Lumpur

Sep 29, 2016 (09:30 local | 01:30 GMT | 04:30 EEST)

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2008/9 Schools Wikipedia Selection. Related subjects: Sports

Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. The paler strip is the cricket pitch. The two sets of three wooden stumps on the pitch are the wickets. The two white lines are the creases.

A Test match between South Africa and England in January 2005. The men wearing black trousers on the far right are the umpires. Test cricket, first-class cricket and club cricket are played in traditional white uniforms and with red cricket balls, while professional One-day cricket is usually played in coloured uniforms and with white balls.

Melbourne

Cricket Ground between Australia and India. The Australian batsmen are wearing yellow, while the fielding team, India, is wearing blue.">

A One Day International match at The Melbourne Cricket Ground between

Australia

and

India

. The Australian batsmen are wearing yellow, while the fielding team, India, is wearing...

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As Revised by the Committee of the Marylebone Cricket Club, 1884 and 1889.

The Game 1. A match is played between two sides of eleven players The Game, each, unless otherwise agreed to; each side has two innings, taken alternately, except in the case provided for in Law 53. The choice of innings shall be decided by tossing.

Runs. 2. The score shall be reckoned by runs. A run is scored—

1st. So often as the batsmen after a hit, or at any time while the ball is in play, shall have crossed and made good their ground from end to end.

2nd. For penalties under Laws 16, 34, 41, and allowances under 44.

Any run or runs so scored shall be duly recorded by scorers appointed for the purpose.

The side which scores the greatest number of runs wins the match. No match is won unless played out or given up, except in the case provided in Law 45.

Appointment of Umpires 3. Before the commencement of the match two Umpires shall be appointed, one for...

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Any questions?

Raphael

:

Cricket?

Nobody understands cricket! You gotta know what a crumpet is to understand cricket!


Casey

: I'll teach you. (

launches Raph into the air and into a trash can with one solid WHACK

) See? Six runs.

Describe Cricket Rules here.

No, really, please do;

it seems to be some organized form ofCalvinball

.

OK then, here's an outline.

The laws of

Cricket

are complex; but at the core are game mechanics shared with

Baseball

and softball:

A strike zone, which the batter ("batsman", always, even if the batsman is female) defends from the pitcher ("bowler"). In baseball, this is an area loosely defined by the umpire. In cricket, it is the area defined by those three wooden sticks in the ground: the stumps, a.k.a the wicket. When the ball hits the stumps, that's an out. The batter hits the ball and at least notionally runs among safe zones to score points, which are called "runs."...
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( Originally Published Early 1900's )

The Marylebone Cricket Club, with its headquarters at Lord's Ground, St. John's Wood, is the supreme legislative assembly as regards Cricket, and it is to the M.C.C. that cricketers look for the revision and alteration of the laws when necessary. Those laws, as at present received, are as follows :

THE LAWS OF CRICKET.

As Amended by the Marylebane Club, 1884, 1889, and 1894.

1. A match is played between two sides of eleven players each, unless otherwise agreed to ; each side has two innings, taken alternately, except in the case provided for in Law 53. The choice of innings shall be decided by tossing.

2. The score shall be reckoned by runs. A run is scored :- 1st. So often as the batsmen after a hit, or at any time while the ball is in play, shall have crossed, and made good their ground, from end to end.

2nd. For penalties under Laws 16, 34, 41, and allowances under 44.

Any run or runs...

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This section is in advanced English and is only intended to be a guide, not to be taken too seriously!
With dictionary look up. Double click on any word for its definition.

Cricket is a bat and ball sport.

The objective of the game is to score more runs (points) than the opposing team. It is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the Commonwealth countries.

In the countries of South Asia , including India , Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far the most popular participatory and spectator sport. It is also a major sport in places such as England and Wales, Australia , New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the English -speaking Caribbean (called the West Indies).

The length of the game (called a match) can last six or more hours a day, for up to five days in Test matches (internationals) the numerous intervals for lunch and tea, and the...

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Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 22-yard-long pitch with a wicket (a set of three wooden stumps) sited at each end. One team, designated the batting team, attempts to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents field. Each phase of play is called an innings. After either ten batsmen have been dismissed or a set number of overs have been completed, the innings ends and the two teams then swap roles. The winning team is the one that scores the most runs, including any extras gained, during their one or two innings.

At the start of each game, two batsmen and eleven fielders enter the field of play. The play begins when a designated member of the fielding team, known as the bowler, delivers the ball from one end of the pitch to the other, towards a set of wooden stumps, in front of which stands one of the batsmen, known as the striker. The striker's role is to prevent...

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Despite all the recent innovations in coaching, some things remain constant.

I have been a coach since 1994 and have taught kids at almost every age and skill level. Long ago I learned that to be a success you need to do certain things. You could be standing in front of 40 8 year olds or trying to get the most out of an elite group of under 16 Academy players. These are the immutable laws of coaching kids' cricket:

1. Be safe

The coach has to protect his or her charges. The boring but important stuff is critical. Know some basic first aid. Have access to a phone for emergencies. Insist players wear helmets when batting and keeping. Always check your coaching area and drills for potential hazard.

Safety also extends to knowing how much work your players can do. Young fast bowlers are usually very keen to bowl and can go past the point of safety. When fatigue rises, technique drops. This increases the chance of injury.

2. Have fun

The...

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D

Daisy-cutter -- See Shooter.

Dead ball -- When the ball is not in play, it is said to be 'dead'. The ball comes into play when the bowler starts his run-up, and becomes automatically dead when the umpire considers it to have 'finally settled' in the hands of the wicket-keeper or bowler, when a wicket falls, or when the ball reaches the boundary or when the umpire calls 'over' or 'time'. The umpire may call the ball dead at other times - for example, when the ball lodges in the batsman's clothing, or when a serious injury occurs to a player.

Declaration -- The decision of the batting captain to close his innings. Usually made in order to give his bowlers time to bowl the other side out to win the match, or delayed by twenty crucial minutes while the side's senior player struggles from 96 to 100.

Declaration bowler -- Inept bowler employed to allow the batting side to score quickly, usually in the hope of contriving a result...

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