How can I be consistent in Snooker?

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Snooker, billiards and pool all offer different challenges, but from pubs to clubs to competition, they offer an accessible option for anyone hoping to pick up a cue.

From popular cue chains to the table down at your local, it shouldn't be hard to find somewhere to hone your skills, but use this club finder if you need a place to start.

Aspire to be like: Ali Carter

Ali Carter has held a career high of world number two, and has been consistently in the top 16, despite being diagnosed with Crohn's disease in 2003 and overcoming testicular cancer and lung cancer in 2013 and 2014 respectively.

Snooker

Whether you choose to play competitively or socially, snooker is sure to get your brain working.

It requires skill and concentration and will improve your focus and hand-eye coordination. Anyone can play regardless of age, gender or ability and it's not an expensive sport to get into.

Snooker is essentially a simple sport, once the...

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Two things separate the best snooker players in the world from the simply very good:

Knowledge The knowledge gained from additional hours of practice makes a wider choice of shots available to the best players. This gives them the crucial advantage in safety battles and helps them to keep a break going when the balls aren’t nicely spread. Consistency Consistency is the key to their success. It is evident in all aspects of their game, from shot routine to cue delivery through to their positional excellence.

MySnookerStats ranks snooker players on their consistency of scoring…

Where a beginner pots one ball and can’t find position to pot the next, the best players in the world do more with each chance at the table than anyone else.

Over a period of matches, we build an accurate view of the capability of any player simply from their patterns of scoring. In fact, we can do this so well that we can place every player in the world on a single rating...

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Lesson #1
The Basics

You want to play the great game of snooker, but don't know how. It is easier than you think! Well, to get started that is, but how good you become relies on many things. Talent is of course a major ingredient to being good at snooker, however you can still play a good game if you practice hard and are disciplined. Over the next months I will try to help with tips on how to improve your game, from the early stages through to the advanced. Also if any of you out there have questions on playing the game let me know and I will try to help.

Ok, I will assume you have a very basic knowledge in the basic principles of play. The first thing I notice about players who are not very good at snooker is their balance. Balance is a key in any sport, and snooker is no exception. Good balance is obtained by having a good stance.

Now, at this point it is worth mentioning that there have been a few top players who have had a dreadfull stance and...

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There’s a popular theory out there that states you can go from a total novice to an expert in just about any subject by doing it for 10,000 hours. The cue sport corollary of that is “hit a million balls,” or HAMB for short. Let’s see how it can shed some light onto our question of “play vs practice.”

A standard full-time job calls for 40 hours per week. With 52 weeks in a year, we can make it simple and say you typically work 2,000 hours per year. So, if you practice snooker like it’s your job, it would take five years for you to become an expert at it. You won’t be winning world titles any time soon, but centuries will probably come more regularly.

Now, let’s go backwards with HAMB:

1,000,000 shots / 5 years = 200,000 shots per year 200,000 shots / 365 days...
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Apparatus for Snooker

"1 x cue (per person)
1 x chalk (another may be needed for fanatics)
1 x pair of eyes (per person)
some balls"

I took out the above as it isn't accurate. You don't need one cue per person. It is quite common to share cues. Chalk isn't essential. Neither are eyes. Angela 18:37, Oct 12, 2003 (UTC)

An apparatus section should include all apparatus, too. Eyes aren't apparatus, but rakes and long cues and racks are. And the distinctive snooker scoreboards, come to think of it. Trontonian Notice I have attempted at an equipment section. I omitted chalk, because I'm not sure of its exact purpose. If someone knows, please could they add it. P.S. I agree about eyes, does anyone know anything about blind snooker? SimonMayer 17:16, Jan 26, 2004 (UTC) I've added chalk to the list, but there are still things missing: balls, table, triangle (to line up the balls) and half butt. I hope to completely review this article at some point....
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Effective use of spins for cue ball control

Introduction

In last month's article I stated that good control of the cue ball comes down, in the main, to the mastery of two main elements - judgement of pace and application of spins. Last month we looked in depth at how to improve your judgement of pace. This month we will look at the application of spin. Improvements in these two areas should take you to the next level of positional play, helping you to make the most of your scoring opportunities as a result of better cue ball control.

When I talk about application of spin in this article I will be referring to centre ball striking only. Side spin is to be left for another day!

Remember that application of spins will be affected by two (technical) variables:

Length of backswing (and/or speed of delivery); and Tip height (i.e. the position on the cue ball that your tip makes contact with)

Just by altering one or both of these variables, you can...

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There are always 15 reds and six colours to pot but there are plenty of subtleties to the game of snooker. Paul Krishnamurty explains all in his guide to profitable snooker betting...

The Basics: Tournaments and formats
Until recently, long-suffering snooker fans were resigned to the terminal decline of our favourite sport. The calendar consisted of fewer than ten events involving the leading players, with no more than five enjoying comprehensive television coverage. Then in 2010, Barry Hearn took over the game's governing body and begun to revolutionise the sport as he had done successfully with darts. Snooker fans can already claim that we've never had it so good.

The highlights remain the big-three 'majors' that are televised in their entirety on BBC. Played in December, the UK Championship is the second most important ranking event of the season. The following month the Masters is restricted to the top-16 ranked players. Finally in May, the pinnacle of any...

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Grizleybear

The Top Ten

1Ronnie O Sullivan

TO ME RONNIE O'SULLIVAN IS THE BEST ALL ROUND SNOOKER PLAYER OF ALL TIME. NOT ONLY IS HE NATURALLY GIFTED TO BE ABLE TO USE BOTH HAND'S, HE ALSO MOST OF THE TIME MANAGE'S TO GET THE ANGLE RIGHT ON HIS NEXT SHOT. HE HAS A VERY QUICK BRAIN, HAS BRILLIANT SAFETY PLAY AND IS FAST BUT PRECISE AT HIS SHOT'S. HE HOLD'S THE FASTEST 147 IN JUST 5 MINUTES AND 20 SECOND'S IS IN 2ND PLACE OF THE MOST CENTURIES MADE AND IS A GREAT ENTERTAINER AND THAT;S WHAT THE CROWD WANT TO SEE PURE TALENT. HE MAY BE GETTING ON A BIT BUT IS STILL OVER ALL MOST PEOPLE'S FAVOURITE SNOOKER PLAYER. HE CAN GET UP SET WITH HIMSELF SOMETIMES BUT WHEN IT COME'S DOWN TO THE ACTUAL SNOOKER IS A GENIUS. WE LOVE YOU RONNIE O'SULLIVAN!

The rocket is the most natural talented player

Agree - naturally gifted - a bit unpredictable but superb

Quickest ever 147 best of all time at his best just a...

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Here’s a list of FAQs and details of how to get in touch with World Snooker

FAQs

Here’s a list of frequently asked questions which may help you find the information you require. If you can’t find what you need, there are email addresses for World Snooker at the bottom of this page.

How do I become a professional player?

Q School runs each May and gives all-comers the chance to qualify for the professional tour. There are 8 places on the main tour available, with the four semi-finalists in each of two events given a place. Keep an eye on this website for details of how to enter. There are also places on the tour and Q School made available to national international associations, who run their own events and arrange entry into tournaments such as the World Amateur Championship and European Championship. Get in touch with your national governing body to find out more.

How do I become a referee?

Get in touch with your NGB and ask how to obtain...

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Image Credit:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snooker

Main Image:

Snooker is a popular cue sport played in the Commonwealth countries besides many English-speaking nations. It is believed that Snooker came to be first played by the British Army officers in India. Today the game is played on professional levels involving a lot of money in the game.

The ‘English’ or the International snooker is what is popular played all over the world. The game is played on a table measuring 6’x12’ which is covered with green baize and has a pocket in the four corners of the table besides the two side pockets. The height of a snooker table is 34", which is measured from the top of the cushion rail to the floor.

How is snooker played?

Snooker is played with the help of a cue and twenty-two snooker balls, with each ball having a diameter of 2-1/16". The composition of the snooker balls includes a cue ball which is white...

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NOTE: My answer is not specific to snooker, but attempts to provide insight toward what, I believe, you are experiencing.

Consistency comes from practice, practice, practice.

As a golfer, I have experienced performances you have had in snooker. Some days, I'm playing well. Other days, not so much. You have been playing snooker for 4 months. I have been playing golf for 15+ years.

We're sitting here talking about practice, not a game. During practice, you get an idea of what you have to work with a given performance (akin to "one day I can see clearly the point I have to aim at ... the following day I can't visualize the shots") and an opportunity to further understand how you perform.

If you are in a less-than-favorable situation (in your case, can't visualize the shot), practice will help you mitigate it. Mind you, mitigation doesn't necessarily mean "strive for peak performance," but it will help turn an unfavorable situation into something manageable...

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Improving Your Game, With Nic Barrow.

To individuals of any standard, and groups. For juniors, or seniors. In the UK, and abroad.

Do You Want To Solve The Problems In Your Game,
And Find These Solutions?…

Winning More Against Friends And In Competitions. Beating Your Highest Break. Getting Better Around The Blackspot. Rest Play, Playing Off The Cushions, And Other Difficult Situations. How To Plan The Shot Before You Get Down. How To Aim And Pot The Ball. How To Move The Cue Straight. How To Control The Cue Ball And ‘Screw Back’. How To Get More Consistent. How To Be More Confident. How To Concentrate Better.

Training Facilities

What Type Of Coaching Can I Get?

In addition to normal 1 to 1 coaching, Nic is also experienced in these environments:

Video Analysis

Junior Class 1998

Winning Gulf Cup in Dubai

Snooker in Schools, Bahrain

Master Coach Certification

...
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Image by vramak (license).

“In essence, if we want to direct our lives, we must take control of our consistent actions. It’s not what we do once in a while that shapes our lives, but what we do consistently.”
Anthony Robbins

Maybe the biggest problem people have when trying to improve something in their lives is that they never take much action at all.

Perhaps the second biggest problem is that they don’t take consistent action over a longer time period.

Now, consistency isn’t really the sexiest or most exciting word in personal development. But it is, coupled with time, what will give you real results in your life. Sticking with the program and doing something consistently – and not just when you feel inspired or something like that – is very, very powerful.

To me it’s also – at least at the moment – one of the most frustrating parts of personal development. Some days go great. Some days really don’t. Quite a few days wind up somewhere...

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A pool cue and its major parts.

[1]:71–72[2]

A cue stick (or simply cue, more specifically pool cue, snooker cue, or billiards cue), is an item of sporting equipment essential to the games of pool, snooker and carom billiards. It is used to strike a ball, usually the cue ball. Cues are tapered sticks, typically about 57–59 inches (about 1.5 m) long and usually between 16 and 21 ounces (450–600 g), with professionals gravitating toward a 19-ounce (540 g) average. Cues for carom tend toward the shorter range, though cue length is primarily a factor of player height and arm length. Most cues are made of wood, but occasionally the wood is covered or bonded with other materials including graphite, carbon fiber or fiberglass. An obsolete term for a cue, used from the 16th to early 19th centuries, is billiard stick.[3][4]

History[edit]

Man playing billiards with cue and woman with mace, from an illustration in

Michael Phelan

's 1859 book,

The Game of...
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