How is the WASP calculated in cricket?

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Winning and Score Predictor (WASP) is a calculation tool used in cricket to predict scores and possible results of a...

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In preparation for egg laying, they construct a protected "nest" (some species dig nests in the ground, while others use pre-existing holes) and then stock it with captured insects. Typically, the prey are left alive, but paralyzed by wasp toxins. The wasps lay their eggs in the provisioned nest and the wasp larvae feed on the paralyzed insects as they develop.

The great golden digger wasp (Sphex ichneumoneus) is found in North America. The developing wasps spend the winter in their nest. When the new generation of adults emerge, they contain the genetically programmed behaviors required to carry out another season of nest building. During the summer, a female might build as many as six nests, each with several compartments for her eggs. The building and provisioning of the nests takes place in a stereotypical, step-by-step fashion.

Sphex has been shown, as in some Jean Henri Fabre studies,[2] not to count how many crickets it collects for its nest. Although the wasp...

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Ascertain the length of the match. The follow-on calculation is used according to the duration of the game, so the required difference in runs for a follow-on in a five-day game is more than a one-day game. Follow the Laws of Cricket (see Resources) to determine the follow-on calculation based on the length of the match.

Determine if the follow-on can be taken. In a five-day match, if team A bats first and scores 289 and team B scores 89 or more runs, the follow-on cannot be enforced. In a one-day game, if team A bats first and scores 145 and team B scores 69 or less, the follow-on can be enforced by team A. The decision is made by the captain of team A.

Perform the follow-on calculation. Use a calculator to be certain of the situation. For example, in a three-day game, team A scores 354 and team B scores 238 -- the follow-on cannot be enforced. In a two-day match, team A scores 278 and team B scores 155 -- the follow-on can be enforced, as the first batting team...

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Cricket is a sport that has been played around the world for more than eight centuries. In fact, there is written evidence of Prince Edward playing cricket in 14th century England. It wasn't until the 17th century, however, that cricket became a professional sport played in competition, and not until a hundred years later that it became known around the world.

Cricket is played by two teams of eleven players each, which take turns to bowl a hard-leather ball. At first view, cricket looks somehow similar to baseball, with players batting a ball and trying to score as many runs as possible. The differences, however, are many. For starters, cricket is played with a flat bat, rather than a rounded one, and players do not run on a square to score a point, but instead run forward in an effort to reach the opposite end of the pitch. If the ball is hit hard enough to go far, a player may keep running back and forth between the opposite ends, scoring one point every time they...

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By Barnaby Haszard Morris

Updated December 16, 2015.

You're probably here because you've taken a glance at the International Cricket Council's official ranking tables for its Test Championship, ODI (one day international) Championship and T20I (Twenty20 International) Championship... and wondered how on Earth they came up with those numbers. Hopefully, by the end of this article, you'll have more of a handle on the ICC's methods.

Overview of the ICC Ranking System

The best way to approach ICC rankings is to look at them as indicator of what ought to happen if one team played another tomorrow. Teams are ranked according to their rating, which is in the fourth column.

As an example, let's imagine South Africa is about to play New Zealand. Here were their rankings at the time of writing:

Team / Matches / Points / Rating
South Africa / 25 / 3002 / 120
New Zealand / 21 / 1670 / 80

As you can see, the table is split into...

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For several decades we have seen projected scores displayed by the sports channel while watching cricket but Sky Sports has offered a completely new system of projecting scores and the winner in the form of WASP. During the first ODI between India and New Zealand viewers were highly fascinated by WASP and then a highly engaging discussion caught up on twitter which made the hashtag #WASP become a trending topic for an entire day. While half of the twitter population was wondering what the term means, the other half was busy giving the answers.

1. What WASP really means?

Winning And Score Prediction abbreviated as WASP is an algorithm of projecting the total score during the first inning and the probability of the batting team being victorious during the second inning.WASP involves more of calculation and less of prediction of which team is going to win the match. It involves several factors such the past performances of the teams. The system also takes...

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WASP (Winning And Score Predictor) is a calculation tool used in cricket to predict scores and possible results of a match. It does not just take the match situation into the equation but also factors like the ease of scoring on the day according to the pitch, weather and boundary size. It gives the prediction of the final total in the first innings, and the probability of the chasing team winning in the second innings. Predictions are based on the average team playing against the average team in those conditions.[1] The models are based on a database of all non-shortened ODI and 20–20 games played between top-eight countries since late 2006 (slightly further back for 20–20 games). The first-innings model estimates the additional runs likely to be scored as a function of the number of balls and wickets remaining. The second innings model estimates the probability of winning as a function of balls and wickets remaining, runs scored to date, and the target score. Projected score or...

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Goblin Week day 4.

When I mentioned that I “liked drawing Goblins riding things that aren’t normally ridden” on Twitter, I got some prompts for ideas for Goblin Mounts. The first two were “Attack Rooster” and “Spikey Worm Lamprey Thing”. I imagine the later is a tame relative of the Mongolian Death Worm. The guy riding it is a Desert Goblin (who I gave a bit of a Mad Max feel to in the costume).

The second picture depicts a giant Toad/Frog being ridden by a Swamp Goblin, and a giant Mole Cricket being ridden by a Mountain Goblin.

There is some textual support for Goblins taming every animal they come across. The novel The Princess and the Goblin, which was influential on Tolkien, claimed that there are no wild beasts in Goblin territory because they had all been domesticated and bred into strange...

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By Ed Yong | November 30, 2011 9:30 am

Thrips are tiny insects, typically just a millimetre in length. Some are barely half that size. If that’s how big the adults are, imagine how small a thrips’ egg must be. Now, consider that there are insects that lay their eggs inside the egg of a thrips.

That’s one of them in the image above – the wasp, Megaphragma mymaripenne. It’s pictured next to a Paramecium and an amoeba at the same scale. Even though both these creatures are made up of a single cell, the wasp – complete with eyes, brain, wings, muscles, guts and genitals – is actually smaller. At just 200 micrometres (a fifth of a millimetre), this wasp is the third smallest insect alive* and a miracle of miniaturisation.

The wasp has several adaptations for life at such a small scale. But the most impressive one of all has just been discovered by Alexey Polilov from Lomonosov Moscow State University, who has spent many years studying the world’s tiniest...

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Winning and Score Predictor (WASP) is a calculation tool used in cricket to predict scores and possible results of a limited overs match, e.g. One Day and Twenty 20 matches.

The prediction is based upon factors like the ease of scoring on the day according to the pitch, weather and boundary size. For the team batting first, it gives the prediction of the final total. For the team batting second, it gives the probability of the chasing team winning, although it does not just take the match situation into the equation. Predictions are based on the average team playing against the average team in those conditions.[1]

The models are based on a database of all non-shortened One Day International (ODI) matches and Twenty20 games played between top-eight countries since late 2006 (slightly further back for Twenty20 games). The batting-first model estimates the additional runs likely to be scored as a function of the number of balls and wickets remaining. The batting-second...

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If you are looking at the complete explanation of that rule I came across nice blog that clears all the doubts regarding working of WASP.

To illustrate, in the first innings model to calculate the expected additional runs when a given number of balls and wickets remain, we could just average the additional runs scored in all matches when that situation arose. This would work fine for situations that have arisen a lot such as 1 wicket down after 10 overs, or 5 wickets down after 40 overs, etc.), but for rare situations like 5 wickets down after 10 overs or 1 wicket down after 40 it would be problematic, partly because of a lack of precision when sample sizes are small but more importantly because those rare situations will be overpopulated with games where there was a mismatch in skills between the two teams. Instead, what we do is estimate the expected runs and the probability of a wicket falling on the next ball only. Let V(b,w) be the expected additional runs...

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Any number of new metrics can be introduced to predict the winning percentages.

A very basic metric would be to use the extrapolation of the current run-rate of the chasing team to determine the winning percentage. Another metric would be to calculate the current form(average of the batsmen-to-come over the past N games(or N months)) and use it to find a projected score. Based on this, one could probably calculate another winning percentage metric. We could add more variables to the mix, such as bowling strike rate, batting strike rate, average score at that stadium, average score by that team in that particular country, and so on.

Even if I added a few more variables to WASP account for a person's form, it would still be incomplete, since it doesn't account for his overseas form/home form, pitch conditions, his mental state and so on.

The point is that at the end of the day, WASP is just yet another metric to make a guess of the probable winning percentage and...

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[UPDATE: January 2015. The post below dates from November 2012 when New Zealand's Sky TV first introduced the WASP in coverage of domestic limited overs cricket. For fans coming here as a result of its being used in the current NZ v SL series, please see

here

for an FAQ. For an explanation of what cricket has to do with Economics, see

here

; and for all the cricket posts on

Offsetting Behaviour,

see

here

.]

In their coverage of the Wellington-Auckland game in the HRV cup last Friday, Sky Sport introduced WASP—the “winning and score predictor” for use in limited-overs games, either 50-over or 20-20 format. In the first innings, the WASP gives a predicted score. In the second innings, it gives a probability of the batting team winning the match.

I am very happy about this as it is based on research by my former doctoral student, Scott Brooker, and me. Not surprisingly, the commentators didn’t go into any details about the way the predictions...

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For years while watching limited overs cricket, we have seen projected scores at different intervals being displayed on our television screens. But in the New Zealand vs India match today, we saw something different in the form of WASP (Winning and Score Prediction). Here, we have a look to differentiate between the two and explain what WASP brings to the table.

Projected scores are completely based on runs scored and looking at different totals at the end of an innings, using various run rates. For example, if a team’s score is 200 at the end of 40 overs. There could be four variations of projected scores:

Current run-rate: 250 6 per over: 260 8 per over: 280 10 per over: 300

Such projections do not bring in the quality of the bowling team, it doesn’t bring in the equation of wickets left and many other parameters into the picture. The only thing it is concerned with is the run rate at which the batting team is going at. In addition, projected scores are...

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WASP is an acronym for "Winning and Scoring Predictor". It is a statistic developed by a University of Canterbury PhD graduate Scott Brooker. It has been a feature of Sky Sports in New Zealand for some time. A lot of Indian cricket fans came across it today for the first time during the 1st ODI between India and New Zealand.

Definition: WASP is a feature of limited overs matches only.

In the first innings of a limited overs match, it works as a scoring predictor. For example, if WASP says 278 at a particular stage of a first innings, it is predicting that the team will score 278 at the end of the innings, if it gets completed. In the second innings, it works as a winning predictor. For example, if WASP says 67% during a match's second innings, it means that the team batting second has a 67% chance of winning the match.
The aspect which sets it apart from most statistical predictors is that it also takes into account pitch conditions, based on historical data of...
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As the WASP got trending after the India-New Zealand first One-Day International (ODI) at Napier, Abhijit Banare gives a brief insight about WASP, why it is interesting and why it is just limited to being a good watch on television.

The first One-Day International (ODI) between India and New Zealand grabbed a lot of attention for a little statistic which kept changing on the right side of the score tab of the television. The Winning and Score Predictor (WASP) is a new statistical tool to predict the outcome of a match. This tool will be used only for ODI and T20 matches. The WASP uses past records of the teams to predict the total score of the team batting first and then predicts the chances of winning for the team batting second.

Who founded it:

The WASP technique is an outcome of a research from University of Canterbury (UC) Phd Graduate Dr Scott Brooker and his supervisor Dr Seamus Hogan. The duo has explained some of the functioning in their research for UC...

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Cricket hunter wasps are dull black, about 3/4 inch long and move with a rapid twitching motion.

Liris beatus (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae) is an unusual wasp that occasionally becomes a pest in Texas homes. Known as the cricket-hunter wasp because of its habit of catching and feeding crickets to its offspring, these wasps are common outdoor insects.

Identification

Cricket-hunter wasps are...

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It has long been the bane of cricket fans to be asked in the middle of a game who is winning.

Now thanks to University of Canterbury (UC) research, Sky Sport are able to provide an answer to the `who’s winning’ question.

In the one day internationals (ODIs) and Twenty20 games shown on Sky Sport this summer, statistical information will include answers from the WASP—the `winning and score predictor’.

In the first innings, the WASP gives a predicted score. In the second innings, it gives a probability of the batting team winning the match. This is based on models developed by UC PhD graduate Dr Scott Brooker and his supervisor Dr Seamus Hogan.

“It is really pleasing to be able to turn on the TV and see one’s research being put to use,” Dr Hogan said today.

“The WASP is not a forecast that could be used to set TAB betting odds. Rather they are estimates about how well the average batting team would go against the average bowling team in the...

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