How the strike rate is calculated if the bowler has not taken any wicket?

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Tom Horan

was the first bowler to take a wicket with his very first delivery in Test cricket.

[1]

Fifty-nine bowlers have taken a wicket with the very first ball they bowled in one of the three formats of international cricket. Twenty bowlers have performed this feat in Test cricket. The first was Australian Tom Horan, who dismissed Walter Read with his first ball on 26 January 1883, and the most recent is South African bowler Hardus Viljoen who dismissed the England captain Alastair Cook on 15 January 2016. Seven of these twenty bowlers have been English cricketers.[1] However, this accomplishment has not always led to a long and illustrious career.[2] Only Maurice Tate, Intikhab Alam and Nathan Lyon went on to play in more than ten Tests.[3][4][5]Arthur Coningham, Matt Henderson, Dennis Smith, and Tyrell Johnson were One-Test wonders, and Smith's only Test wicket was the one he took with his first ball.[6][7][8][9]

In One Day International (ODI) matches,...

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Peak-33
By Andy Zaltzman

How good was Ian Botham? Overall he averaged 28.40 with the ball, 33.54 with the bat. In the first 25 Tests of his 102-Test career, those figures are 18.52 and 40.48; in the final 25, 42.00 bowling, 23.45 batting. Overall-Botham was very good. Late-slump-Botham, scuttled by injury and time, did not merit selection. Peak-Botham was one of the greatest Test cricketers of all time. Peak-Waqar took 19 five-fors in his first 31 Tests; Increasing-Back-Trouble-Waqar took only three more in his final 56 games.

Cricket needs a measure of how good a player was in his best years. There are, evidently, greater priorities on this often-malfunctioning planet, and in this often-malfunctioning sport, but the career average, at best, needs considerable prodding to reveal its truths, and, at worst, is wilfully misleading. I therefore unveil: Peak-33 - a player's numbers in the best 33-Test phase of their careers.

Peak-33 is based on the 33...

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Ravichandran Ashwin is growing stronger and stronger with each passing day. The off-spinner is shattering records after almost every match and is looks well set to break many in his career.

In his short career so far, the Tamil Nadu bowler has already achieved a lot of milestones and he added another feather to his hat when he dismissed New Zealand’s last batsman Trent Boult to help India win the third Test at Indore and win the series by 3-0.

Boult’s wicket was Ashwin’s seventh wicket in the second innings and 13th of the match, giving the offie his sixth ten-wicket haul in Tests. 7 for 59 is now his best in a Test innings while 13 for 140 is his career best figures.

Talking about Ashwin’s latest milestone, the bowler now leads the list of the best strike-rate among the spinners who have taken 100 or more wickets in Tests in the last 100 years.

With a stunning strike rate of 49.4, the Indian off-spinner has left behind the likes of legendary Shane Warne...

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DM's Explanation of Cricket - Statistics Cricket is a game rich in statistical information. Over multiple games within a series, season, or an entire career, each player accumulates a set of statistics that can be used to compare the performances of different players.

Statistics for different classes of matches are recorded separately, in particular a top-level player would have statistics recorded for:

Test matches. One-day internationals. First class matches, including Test matches. List-A one-day matches, including one-day internationals.

Batting Statistics

The statistics accumulated for a batsman are: Matches: The number of matches played. Innings: The number of innings batted. Not Outs: The number of not out innings - not including times when the player did not bat. Runs: The number of runs scored. High Score: The highest score achieved in a single innings. Balls: The number of balls faced. ( Extra Detail: This has only been recorded...
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This is a follow-up to the bowler streaks article published last month. In addition to providing additional analysis on the topic by specifically responding to a couple of very nice queries, I have also attempted to present a new concept to get additional insights to the vexed question of "Wickets - how good are they?" In summary, akin to "Supply-side Economics" being presented as an alternate economic theory, I have tried to present this analysis as the study of bowling from the angle of the dismissed batsmen.

One often repeated query on the article centered on the number of wickets taken by the bowlers. Muttiah Muralitharan's 800 was said to contain over 160 wickets against the so-called "minnows" while Shane Warne's 708 wickets was seen to be more valuable since it contained only 17 wickets against these weaker Test teams. This argument seemed quite sound until I pointed out a fundamental error in this assumption. Is the wicket of Shakib Al Hasan less valuable than that...

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The

bowling average

is one of a number of statistics used to compare bowlers in the sport of

cricket

. It is the ratio of runs conceded per

taken, meaning that the lower the bowling average is, the better the bowler is performing. The bowling average is commonly used alongside the economy rate and the strike rate to judge the overall performance of a bowler. Where a bowler has taken only a small number of wickets, their average can be artificially low, and an increase in wickets taken can result in large changes in their bowling average. Due to this, qualification caveats are generally applied to determine career records for bowling averages. After applying these criteria,

George Lohmann

holds the record for the lowest average in

Test cricket

, having claimed 112 wickets at an average of 10.75.

Calculation

A cricketer's bowling average is calculated by dividing the numbers of runs they have conceded by the number of

they have...

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Please read the Part-1 of the series here ( If you haven’t already) before proceeding.

In the previous segment, these legendary players were compared on various aspects from batting averages in chases, ability to win matches for their country during pressure scenarios to their performances in home/away conditions and day/DN matches. This article intends to take the readers further on a journey of qualitative evaluation of the matches they have been involved and their ability to adapt to dynamically changing match scenarios. Most of the evaluation parameters would be non-conventional and offbeat, which we would like to retain in our further articles

Belonging to different generations, there is a stark difference in the way these batsmen approached the target. Many a times they have been able to keep the game in their control, but there have been occasions when they had to follow the game’s tide. In hindsight, the changing rules and the emergence of newer cricket forms...

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This section is in advanced English and is only intended to be a guide, not to be taken too seriously!
With dictionary look up. Double click on any word for its definition.

A

Agricultural shot

a swing across the line of the ball played without much technique. Often one that results in a chunk of the

pitch

being dug up by the

bat

. A type of a

slog

.


All out

when an

innings

is ended due to ten of the eleven

batsmen

on the batting side being either

dismissed

or unable to bat because of injury or illness.


All-rounder

a player adept at batting and bowling, or batting and wicket-keeping.


All-round spin

a player who can bowl both wrist spin and finger spin adeptly.


Anchor

a top-order batsman capable of batting for a long duration throughout the innings. Usually batsman playing at numbers 3 or 4 play such a role, especially if there is a batting collapse. An anchor...

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Strike rate refers to two different statistics in the sport of cricket. Batting strike rate is a measure of how frequently a batsman achieves the primary goal of batting, namely scoring runs. Bowling strike rate is a measure of how frequently a bowler achieves the primary goal of bowling, namely taking wickets (i.e. getting batsmen out).

Both strike rates are relatively new statistics, having only been invented and considered of importance after the introduction of One Day International cricket in the 1970s.

Batting strike rate[edit]

International batting strike rates as of January 2004

Batting strike rate is defined for a batsman as the average number of runs scored per 100 balls faced. The higher the strike rate, the more effective a batsman is at scoring quickly.

In Test cricket, a batsman's strike rate is of secondary relevance to his ability to score runs without getting out. This means a Test batsman's most important statistic is...

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The bowling average is one of a number of statistics used to compare bowlers in the sport of cricket. It is the ratio of runs conceded per wickets taken, meaning that the lower the bowling average is, the better the bowler is performing. The bowling average is commonly used alongside the economy rate and the strike rate to judge the overall performance of a bowler. Where a bowler has taken only a small number of wickets, their average can be artificially low, and an increase in wickets taken can result in large changes in their bowling average. Due to this, qualification caveats are generally applied to determine career records for bowling averages. After applying these criteria, George Lohmann holds the record for the lowest average in Test cricket, having claimed 112 wickets at an average of 10.75.

Calculation[edit]

A cricketer's bowling average is calculated by dividing the numbers of runs they have conceded by the number of wickets they have taken.[2] The...

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Cricket is a sport that generates a large number of statistics.

Statistics are recorded for each player during a match, and aggregated over a career. At the professional level, statistics for Test cricket, one-day internationals, and first-class cricket are recorded separately. However, since Test matches are a form of first-class cricket, a player's first-class statistics will include their Test match statistics – but not vice versa. Nowadays records are also maintained for List A and Twenty20 limited over matches. These matches are normally limited over games played domestically at the national level by leading Test nations. Since one-day internationals are a form of List A limited over matches, a player's List A statistics will include their ODI match statistics – but not vice versa.

General statistics[edit]

Matches (Mat/M): Number of matches played. (also Played (Pl).) Catches (Ct): Number of catches taken. Stumpings (St): Number of stumpings made (as...
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By Barnaby Haszard Morris

Updated February 28, 2016.

Definition:

A bowler's strike rate in cricket is the average number of balls they bowl per wicket. This is calculated simply:

Bowling strike rate = Number of balls bowled / Number of wickets taken

The lower a bowler's strike rate, the more frequently they take wickets. It's therefore preferable to strive for a low strike rate in bowling.

Notes:

Bowling strike rate is a more useful measure in Test and first-class cricket than in one day matches or Twenty20s. In those shorter forms of the game, it is generally more important for a bowler to concede as few runs as possible, whereas in the longer forms the bowler's primary function is to take wickets. Also, wickets fall more frequently in limited overs cricket, making strike rate in ODIs and T20s as much a measure of an attacking batting mindset as of bowler effort. With batters playing more defensively in Tests and first-class matches,...
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Muttiah Muralitharan has captured the highest number of wickets in Test cricket.

[1]

Taking 300 or more wickets across a playing career is considered a significant achievement in Test cricket.[2][3][4] The feat, first accomplished by Englishman Fred Trueman in 1964,[5] has only been achieved by thirty players in the history of the game as of May 2016. Five Australian players have taken more than 300 wickets, along with five Englishmen, four South Africans, four members of the West Indies cricket team, four Indians, three Pakistanis, two New Zealanders and three Sri Lankan players; Bangladesh and Zimbabwe are yet to see a Test player reach the 300 mark.[6]

As of August 2015, the retired Sri Lankan bowler Muttiah Muralitharan has the highest aggregate with 800 wickets.[6] He has also taken the most five-wicket hauls in an innings and ten-wicket hauls in a match, 67 and 22 times respectively, and has the fifth best bowling performance in a match, 16 wickets for 220...

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