If the batsman hits the FIRST above shoulder height delivery in an over,will it be signalled one legal bouncer for the over?

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It's probably worth starting by noting that your understanding of the regulations is incorrect: bowlers are allowed two fast short-pitched deliveries per over in a One Day International. Quoting from the current regulations, section 42.4.1:

Law 42.6 (a) shall be replaced by the following:

a) A bowler shall be limited to two fast short-pitched deliveries per over.

(my emphasis). Perhaps you are getting confused with Twenty20 internationals where the limit is one bouncer per over?

In any case, further reading of section 42.4.1 also gives the definition of a fast short-pitched delivery:

b) A fast short-pitched delivery is defined as a ball which passes or would have passed above the shoulder height of the striker standing upright at the popping crease.

(again, my emphasis). This makes it clear that it doesn't matter if the batsman hits the ball or not - if the ball would have passed above shoulder height, it counts as one of the...

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In the sport of cricket a No ball is a penalty against the fielding team, usually as a result of an illegal delivery by the bowler. For most cricket games, especially amateur games, the definition of all forms of No ball is from the MCC Laws of Cricket,[1] although youth cricket often has stricter rules on beamers, and international cricket has stricter rules on beamers, but laxer rules on bouncers.

The delivery of a No ball results in one run - two under some Regulations - to be added to the batting team's score, and an additional ball must be bowled. In addition, the number of ways in which the batsman can be given out is reduced except for run out. In shorter competition cricket, a batsman receives a 'free hit' on the ball after any kind of No ball (see below). This means the batsman can freely hit one ball with no danger of being out in most ways.

No balls due to overstepping the crease are not uncommon, especially in short form cricket, and fast bowlers tend to...

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Traditionally, cricket matches have two umpires on the field, one standing at the end where the bowler delivers the ball (Bowler's end), and one directly opposite the facing batsman (usually, but not always, at square leg). However, in the modern game, there may be more than two umpires; for example Test Matches have four: two on-field umpires, a third umpire who has access to video replays, and a fourth umpire who looks after the match balls, takes out the drinks for the on-field umpires, and also arranges travel and meals for all of the umpires.

Since 2002, the ICC has two panels of umpires: namely the Elite Panel of Umpires (two of which are, in theory, appointed to each Test Match) and the larger International Panel of Umpires.

Professional matches also have a match referee, who complements the role of the umpires. The match referee makes no decisions relevant to the outcome of the game, but instead enforces the ICC Cricket Code of Conduct, ensuring the game is...

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