In which ways does drinking gallons of water prepare one for a competitive eating contest?

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This is known as water training.

Training with water far before an eating competition is very common. The act of chugging a gallon of water quickly over a long period of time will indeed stretch your stomach. If the competitor does this regularly before a competition, it will help him/her fit more food in their stomach.

As a side note, this is not recommended by doctors as it is very dangerous. Drinking a large amount of water in a short period of time can dilute the electrolytes in your blood, which can lead to a loss of heart, muscle and brain function.

Quotes from competitors on water training...

"Lerman, 42, says he trains every day to stay in top shape. Like most competitive eaters, he drinks massive amounts of water, more than a gallon at a time, to stretch his stomach. Only rookies think that fasting helps."

"Champion eater Eric "Badlands" Booker, who has been training by drinking 4-1/2 litres of water in three minutes, twice a day,...

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“Competitive eating isn't a sport. It's one of the seven deadly sins.”

Competitive eating is a "sport" that involves

fast-food

junkies stuffing their mouths with as much food as possible, typically against better judgment. I know, it's disgusting isn't it? Competitive eating is one of the most popular activities in the

Drunk Olympics

and has long been dominated by the Americans, whose diets consist solely of fast-food. However, the

Japanese

, most of whom survive on only 1,000 calories a day, have recently established dominance in competitive eating, though this is likely part of Japan's wicked plot to defeat America in every activity known to man. Along with

Cup Stacking

, competitive eating has become the world's most popular pseudo-sport.

The sport of competitive eating originated in 1939, when Benito Mussolini challenged Adolf Hitler and Emperor Hirohito to an eating contest. Thus began the first annual Axis of Evil Hot Dog Eating Competition....

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How full do competitve eaters get? Think more than four Thanksgiving dinners' worth

iStock/StephanieFrey

Joey Chestnut, the eight-time winner of the Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest, downed 69 dogs in his 2013 victory. That adds up to a staggering 21,321 calories, or more than four-and-a-half times a typical Thanksgiving dinner (around 4,500). It’s also the amount of calories that most people take in more than eight and a half days. Want to give yourself mental heartburn? Picture stockpiling an entire week's worth of food—then eating it all at once.

The eating speed will make your head spin

iStock/martiapunts

Ever read about competitive eaters and thought, “I really like eating wings or hot dogs or pizza or cheesecakes; I bet I could do that”? Eating contests have strict time limits to intensify their challenges. Nathan’s Hot Dog Contest is a measly 10 minutes long. Chestnut eats nine hot dogs per minute in the beginning, then slows to a rate of 5.9 hot...

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Joey Chestnut reclaimed his hot dog eating crown on Monday, defeating defending champ Matt Stonie. Time_Sports

On the 241st anniversary of his country's independence, American Joey Chestnut ate 72 hot dogs in 10 minutes. A new record.

"Jaws," as Chestnut is known, put down a summer's worth of cased meats at the Nathan's Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest on Tuesday. It was an impressive physical accomplishment and a gargantuan intake of calories, fat and salt.

The competition, which started in 1916, is a true gut-buster.

To stuff in that much meat and bun, competitors train their stomachs to expand, ruin their ability to feel full and risk long-term damage to their digestive systems.

How do they fit so much in?

The normal human stomach is about the size of a Nerf football, said Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist David Fleischer. At its biggest, it stretches about 15%.

On the other hand, competitive eaters can expand their stomachs two...

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Once again the top dogs saw off the underdogs at this year's edition of the Nathan's Famous July fourth hot dog eating contest in New York.

In the early afternoon, Joey 'Jaws' Chestnut, 33, successfully took home his tenth victory at the event, held near the original Nathan's Famous store in Coney Island, Brooklyn, by devouring 72 hot dogs in just ten minutes.

Earlier, in the morning, the women's competition saw Las Vegas' Miki Sudo, 31, retaining her belt for another year, beating 17 others by chowing down a personal best of 41 hot dogs.

Scroll down for video

Joey 'Jaws' Chestnut (pictured) triumphed in the men's competition at the Nathan's Famous hot dog eating contest on Tuesday, taking home the prized belt for the tenth time in 11 years

Chestnut fended off Matt Stonie (pictured in black headband), who ate into his spree in 2015, to take home the prize once more. If he can retain the belt by 2019, he will have broken records at the...

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Grabianowski describes two methods of training the brain to ignore a full stomach. The first involves repeatedly filling the stomach with large meals. This stretches the stomach muscles and helps prepare them for the strain of an eating contest. The second method is called water training, which consists of drinking an entire gallon of water in 30 seconds or less. The water also stretches the stomach muscles, making it easier for the stomach to handle large quantities of food.

Training by stretching the stomach muscles is very unhealthy, according to Grabianowski. Eating large meals too frequently or drinking large quantities of water can perforate the stomach lining. Drinking a gallon of water in 30 seconds can also result in water intoxication, which can be fatal. Too much water in a short amount of time dilutes the electrolytes in a person's blood, which can result in a loss of heart, muscle and brain function.

Learn more about Diet...
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Competitive eater Takeru Kobayashi eats 67 hot dogs in Manhattan contest; not enough to match Joey Chestnut on Coney Island. Story aired July 4, 2013 on NTD Network.

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[Matt Gnaizda, NTD Reporter]:
"It's American Independence Day. And it may come as no surprise that Americans have the stomach for not one, but two competitive hot dog eating contests today. This one here at the Eventi hotel in Manhattan features former six-time Coney Island hot dog eating champion Takeru "Kobi" Kobayashi.

[Alex, Spectator]:
"We are supremely excited. We're big fans of competitive eating in general, and of Kabayashi in particular."

[Wataru, Spectator]:
"I'm so excited because Kobi is my friend. And I'm from the same hometown from Japan."

[Shota, Spectator]:
"Kobi came to our hospital when he was delivered. Kobi was the first guest he had. So he is coming to cheer him."

And the race is on. It's Kobi versus five other competitors....

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Competitive eating, or speed eating, is an activity in which participants compete against each other to consume large quantities of food in a short time period. Contests are typically eight to ten minutes long, although some competitions can last up to thirty minutes, with the person consuming the most food being declared the winner. Competitive eating is most popular in the United States, Canada, and Japan, where organized professional eating contests often offer prizes, including cash.

History

Pie-eating contest at the Jefferson School in Washington, DC, August 2, 1923.

Traditionally, eating contests, often involving pies, were events at county fairs. The recent surge in the popularity of competitive eating is due in large part to the development of the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest, an annual holiday tradition that has been held on July 4 virtually every year since the 1970s at Coney Island.[1] In 2001, Takeru Kobayashi transformed the competition and...

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Competitive eaters from around the world will converge on Coney Island on Monday, for one of the sport’s most prized events: Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July international hot dog eating contest.

The spectacle involves around 20 contestants shoving dozens of hot dogs down their mouths in under 10 minutes. Last year saw the eight-time champion Joey Chestnut unseated by rising star Matt Stonie.

From its origins in small pie eating contests at county fairs, competitive eating has grown exponentially. The Nathan’s contest is now broadcast nationally on ESPN.

But how – should one wish to – does one get into the world of competitive eating? The Guardian asked two competitive eaters, Nela Zisser and Yasir Salem, for tips.

Zisser, a 24-year old model and pre-med student, started in her native New Zealand when her mother suggested she enter a pizza-eating contest. She made it to the final round, beating 19 burly men. Last year, a New Zealand comedy show sponsored...

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Week 1: Drinking A Gallon Of Water Isn't Easy

Although my gallon water jug became my sidekick for the month as I lugged it around with me to and from work, I didn’t always make it to a full gallon every day—it’s way harder than you’d think! At first, it felt more like torture: A sudden influx of water into my system left me feeling bloated. I spent more time running to and from the bathroom than working at my desk. I’d enjoy the first part of my afternoon walk with my dog, but then end up racing him home because I had to pee. It wasn't exactly a good time, but the promises that come with being less dehydrated—sleeping better at night, eating less junk food, clearer skin, and more energy—kept me chugging along.

Photograph courtesy of kris rile

Week 2: A Snacking Makeover

By the start of week two I didn’t feel any different—just full of water. I was bummed. And bloated. But then I started noticing that I was actually making better food choices. I am a...

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Water, whether bottled or from the tap, is a healthy, zero-calorie drink that helps your body stay fully hydrated. Proper hydration is key for optimal body function, and not consuming enough water can lead to serious complications, including dehydration. Drinking a gallon of water a day is more than the recommended intake but will not have any harmful effects on your system if you are not dehydrated.

Water makes up more than 60 percent of your body weight, and without it, you would not survive more than a few days. All of your body’s cells and organs need water to run, and it also functions as a lubricant in your body. Excess water is removed from your body through sweating as well as urination. MedlinePlus recommends drinking six to eight 8-ounce glasses per day. While a gallon of water is double the recommended intake, the excess will simply be excreted by your body.

If you are exposed to high temperatures,...

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On the 240th anniversary of his country's independence, American Joey Chestnut ate 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes. A new record.

"Jaws," as Chestnut is known, put down a summer's worth of cased meats at the Nathan's Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest in 2016. It was an impressive physical accomplishment and a gargantuan intake of calories, fat and salt.

The competition, which started in 1916 and will be held again Tuesday, is a true gut-buster.

To stuff in that much meat and bun, competitors train their stomachs to expand, ruin their ability to feel full and risk long-term damage to their digestive systems.

How do they fit so much in?

The normal human stomach is about the size of a Nerf football, said Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist David Fleischer. At its biggest, it stretches about 15%.

On the other hand, competitive eaters can expand their stomachs two to three times their normal size.

Nobody knows for sure why people such as...

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Take a minute to digest this: Joey Chestnut ate 70 hot dogs in 10 minutes on the Fourth of July.

And if that isn’t insane enough for you, chew on this: One week later, also in 10 minutes, he scarfed down 194 chicken wings.

Chestnut is the reigning champion of the most famous eating competition in the U.S., the Nathan's Famous International Hot Dog Eating Contest, held every Independence Day at Coney Island in Brooklyn, New York. But for the man they call “Jaws,” Nathan’s is just an appetizer.

Seven days later, Chestnut was in Las Vegas, where he won the Hooters Worldwide Wing Eating Championship.

Major League Eating (MLE), one of the country's largest organizations that sanctions professional competitive eating events and specials, calls the 32-year-old Californian the “greatest eater in history.”

NATHAN’S FAMOUS CELEBRATES 44TH ANNUAL CONEY ISLAND HOT DOG EATING CONTEST

The public’s fascination with eating competitions isn’t new. To be...

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Man vs Food vs Stomach Capacity: How (and for how long) should I "train" my stomach to hold six pounds of food? What can the stomach handle? How does food differ from liquid in the stomach? Additional tips for beating restaurant eating challenges? Lots of questions, and an account of my experience preparing so far, after the break.

So my wife and I watch a lot of Man v. Food, and oddly enough I have found it a bit inspiring lately... increasing my interest in competing in some kind of eating challenge. Well, the ideal opportunity to do just that has presented itself. A popular local dive has created a new challenge: a five-pound burger (2.5lbs meat + 2.5lbs bun/condiments), plus a pound of fries and a one hour time limit.

I have a small frame, weighing around 125 pounds, but I have always been able to eat lots of food if I wanted to. When I was 12, I easily ate a 36oz steak along with all the sides and a full beverage. Nowadays though, I eat much more conservatively,...

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A figure competition falls between the physique and bikini divisions in a bodybuilding show. It’s not as cut and detailed as the physique division but it’s much harder and more defined than the bikini division. The reason bodybuilding competitions exist are for people to showcase their hard-earned muscle and amazing physiques that they have worked so hard to attain. Competitors also showcase their individual personalities and posing routines. Each competitor is very different in their own right. These fitness shows can run all day long and start as early as 8 am and run until after midnight depending on how many competitors are in the show. Many competitors will travel from all over the world to compete against their peers. These events are open to the public so anyone can come and enjoy the show along with the competitor’s family and friends.

There are two divisions for the men and these include physique and bodybuilding. For women, there are five divisions which include...

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ranked No. 1 in the world by the International Federation of

Competitive Eating -- attributes his accomplishments to hard work, not

gluttony. But many doctors worry that competitive eating can have dangerous

consequences. And some dietitians worry that the sport sends the wrong message

at a time when obesity is growing to epidemic proportions.

Secrets of Competitive Eating

Chestnut, 23, a project engineer from San Jose, Calif., says his success
results from intensive training. "I slowly make my body adapt to my
goal," he says, comparing himself to a bodybuilder or a marathoner.

Chestnut trains about once a week, eating mass quantities of whatever food
he's expected to consume for the next eating contest. What kinds of foods? The
list includes hamburgers, hot wings, oysters, deep-fried asparagus, key lime
pie, chicken wings, cheesecake, and lobster. B

Chestnut also practices by drinking up to a...

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Competitive eating, or speed eating, is an activity in which participants compete against each other to consume large quantities of food in a short time period. Contests are typically less than 15 minutes in length, with the person consuming the most food being declared the winner. Competitive eating is most popular in the United States and Japan, where organized professional eating contests often offer $10,000 or more in prize money. Competitive eaters are sometimes known as "gurgitators," a word used by those close to the sport and an assumed opposite of regurgitation.

History

Pie-eating contest at the Jefferson School in Washington, DC, August 2, 1923.

Traditionally, eating contests (usually involving pies) were events at county fairs. The recent surge in the popularity of competitive eating is due in large part to televised coverage of the Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest, an annual holiday tradition that has...

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Competitive eating is the process of consuming large amounts of food within a required timeframe. Traditionally, the eating contests were held at fairs to dispose of left over food. Now competitive eating has become big business. Competitors can take part in contests all over the country with large cash prizes awarded to the winners.

The International Federation of Competitive Eating (IFCO) holds events for competitive eating all around the world. In 2005 prize money awarded totaled 230,000 US dollars (USD). One of the most popular contests is held every 4th of July on Coney Island in New York. Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest originated in 1916 and the event has been dominated by Takeru Kobayashi. The Japanese competitor managed to eat 54 hot dogs in 12 minutes and has won the contest six years in a row.

The main types of food eaten in the contests are of the fast food variety. Hot dogs, chicken wings, pickles, corndogs and pizza are staples of the contests. The...

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Most of the time, Yasir Salem is a mild-mannered marketing director. But on weekends, he regularly pulls off incredible gastrointestinal feats as a championship-winning competitive eater. And it all started as a joke. “I was watching the Nathan’s contest in 2008, and I thought, ‘Wow, all I have to do is eat a bunch of hot dogs and I can be on ESPN?’" he says with a laugh. "I soon learned that it's not that easy.”

But Salem stuck to it, and these days, he's a seasoned competitive eater, ranked #10 in the world. We couldn’t resist asking him for a few tricks of the trade.

1. THERE’S NO MANUAL ...

When Salem wanted to get started, he didn’t hire a trainer. First, he turned to the internet, and then, as he began to compete, got advice from other competitive eaters. “If you enter enough contests, you get friendly with them, and they’ll share tidbits of how they make things happen,” he says.

2. ... BUT THERE IS A SEASON—AND A PROFESSIONAL...

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Competitive eaters have a few secrets that they have developed over the years to help them stuff food into themselves a little bit faster. The most basic is the water dunk. Virtually every competitor keeps a cup of water at the table to dip the contest food. This softens and lubricates the food, allowing them to chew it faster and swallow it more easily. Technically any liquid could be used, but anything that has calories will make it harder to eat more in the long run.

Another key technique is to break the food into smaller pieces before eating it. This allows competitors to fit more food into their mouths at once, and also cuts down on chewing time. Kobayashi's "Solomon Technique" (also referred to as "Japanesing") involves breaking a hot dog in half and then stuffing both halves into the mouth at once. Otherwise, it would be difficult to fit an entire hot dog at once because of the length. Almost all serious eaters eat hot dogs and buns separately.

Other than...

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Milk chugging, or the "gallon challenge," was a thing a few years ago. The rules are pretty simple: Drink a gallon of milk in 60 minutes, and keep it down. It is harder than it sounds, as many a high schooler and college student have discovered.

Popularized by the MTV show Jackass, "this activity hasn't proven deadly," says Miriam Weiner at U.S. News. But "gallon challengers inevitably face an unpleasant round of vomiting and possibly diarrhea, cramps, and bloating" after attempting the feat. (The Jackass video is here — I'm not embedding it because it is gross. You've been warned.)

Earlier this month, at Uncle Bob's Self Storage in Upper Saddle River, N.J., freakishly fast competitive eater Takeru Kobayashi not only successfully completed the gallon challenge — he obliterated it. (Watch above) Kobayashi downed an entire gallon of whole milk in 20 seconds. And that wasn't even the main event: He was merely washing down the 13 cupcakes he'd just swallowed in one minute...

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Even if you are training with low calorie fruits and vegetables such as cabbage or watermelon, there is an extremely high chance that you will be consuming a higher than normal amount of calories than your body is typically used to processing. Also, since food is not digested very quickly, you may experience discomfort for a longer period of time after eating a lot, which is a drawback for obvious reasons. Consistently consuming more calories than you burn off will lead to excess weight gain, and I am not referring to muscle weight in your arms and legs. To avoid the extra calories and increased weight gain, some eaters train to increase their stomach capacity by using water and other calorie-free liquids. While this method can be effective, it can be a lot more dangerous too, so please read The Extreme Dangers Of Water Training if you have not already. With that being said, there are ways to slowly and safely increase your stomach capacity using water, and you must do it gradually...

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1

Be in good physical and mental shape. It is important to ensure that you're healthy and fit before trying an eating contest. Consult your physician before the contest and get their advice. Make sure that you aren't on medication that shouldn't be taken with food. Check with contest officials that EMTs and an ambulance will be present in the event of choking or allergic reactions, or third-degree burns on the roof of your mouth from searing hot taco beef.

2

Look for eating contests that are close to you.

Find out how to apply and what things you need to know to be involved by phoning or calling in person to see the event organizer. Besides the local news, you can look online at the sites of the professional eating bodies, such as Major League Eating and the Association of Independent Competitive Eaters, to see what contests they are running or supporting. As an amateur, things that you might like to look for in the competition include:

Short length (no...
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Salem, the world's 12th ranked competitive eater and top cannoli eater, wolfed down the first 27 and a half hot dogs during regulation time and another two and a half during the tie-breaking eat-off at the qualifying round of Nathan's Famous Hot Dog Eating Contest in St. Paul. Hot Dish caught up with Salem to learn how he got his start, his training schedule, and the ethics of the sport.

See also: Nathan's Famous hot dog-eating contest to host qualifying round in St. Paul

Hot Dish: How was the competition?

Yasir Salem: It was a little unusual with the eat-off, which doesn't usually happen. It's quite unusual to have a tie in an eating contest. When we hit the end mark of the 10-minute contest, we've already pushed ourselves to the absolute limit, so to go beyond that sets us up for a possibility of not doing as well.

What is the appeal of competitive eating?

Everybody obviously has different reasons. I'm basically a marketing executive in New...

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The 24 hours before your eating competition are definitely the most critical hours of your training period. If you don’t take these hours seriously, your body will not be at peak performance during your challenge or contest. Before you read this article, please make sure that you have read and understand How To Expand Your Stomach Using Food, How To Expand Your Stomach Using Water, Expanding Your Stomach Using Food AND Water, and even read A 48 Hour Stomach Crash Training Plan. Since you will be following plans similar to these, and they all lead up to this critical 24 hour period before the competition starts, you will understand this article better if you read them first. You’ll be using the results of your past training days to plan out this period. Now let’s get into the real “meat and potatoes” of what you need to do to prepare for your challenge so that you can DOMINATE!!

The Very Important Max Out Meal

As mentioned in all of the other training articles, the...

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