Is it a boundary if a fielder touches the boundary before touching the ball?

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Not a boundary - see Law 19.3(a):

A boundary shall be scored [...] whenever, while the ball is in play, [...]

(i) the ball touches the boundary, or is grounded beyond the boundary.

(ii) a fielder with some part of his person in contact with the ball, touches the boundary or has some part of his person grounded beyond the boundary.

(iii) the ball, having crossed the boundary in the air, is first touched by a fielder who has not satisfied the conditions in 4(i) below.

Section 4(i) is the requirement that a fielder cannot jump from beyond the boundary to make the first touch on a ball.

The crucial part here is clause (ii) which makes reference only to the current position of the fielder, not any previous position; therefore it doesn't matter what they may have done before the catch is made, it's only where they're positioned while the catch is being...

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In cricket a boundary is the edge or boundary of the playing field, or a scoring shot where the ball is hit to or beyond that point.

Edge of the field[edit]

The boundary is the edge of the playing field, or the physical object marking the edge of the field, such as a rope or fence. In low-level matches, a series of plastic cones are often used. Since the early 2000s the boundaries at professional matches are often a series of padded cushions carrying sponsors' logos strung along a rope. If it is moved during play (such as by a fielder sliding into the rope) the boundary is considered to remain at the point where that object first stood.

A traditional boundary rope.

When the cricket ball is inside the boundary, it is live. When the ball is touching the boundary, grounded beyond the boundary, or being touched by a fielder who is himself either touching the boundary or grounded beyond it, it is dead and the batting side usually scores 4 or 6 runs for...

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There are these things cricket tragics do from time to time. We picture ourselves playing the perfect cover drive, or getting the ball to swing from leg, square the batsman up, and hit off stump. Often both in the same Test match – at Lord’s, of course – on the way to a big century and a seven-wicket haul.

There was a period in the mid-1980s when some of these daydreams centred on fielding – that pick-up-and-throw Mohammed Azharuddin did. The dreams returned in the early-1990s again, after Jonty Rhodes did his Superman act.

Of late, I was thinking about fielding again, especially with the Indian Premier League on, which showcased some truly breathtaking feats, the occasional boo-boo notwithstanding. The best of these, as is usually the case these days, were out on the boundary line, where fielders jumped and leapt, tottered and tumbled, dived, even flew, to...

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Learn more about Boundary (cricket)

Boundary has two distinct meanings in the sport of cricket.

[edit] Edge of the field

The boundary is the edge of the playing field, or the physical object marking the edge of the field, such as a rope or fence. If the physical object is moved during play (such as by a fielder sliding into the rope) the boundary is considered to remain at the point where that object first stood.

When the cricket ball is inside the boundary, it is in play. When the ball is touching the boundary, beyond the boundary, or being touched by a fielder who is himself either touching or beyond the boundary, it is out of play and the batting side usually scores 4 or 6 runs for hitting the ball out of play. Because of this rule, fielders near the boundary attempting to intercept the ball often flick the ball back in to the field of play rather than pick it up directly, and then return to pick it up after having slid into the boundary and...

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In cricket a boundary is the edge or boundary of the playing field, or a scoring shot where the ball is hit to or beyond that point.

Edge of the field

The boundary is the edge of the playing field, or the physical object marking the edge of the field, such as a rope or fence. In low-level matches, a series of plastic cones are often used. Since the early 2000s the boundaries at professional matches are often a series of padded cushions carrying sponsors' logos strung along a rope. If it is moved during play (such as by a fielder sliding into the rope) the boundary is considered to remain at the point where that object first stood.When the cricket ball is inside the boundary, it is live. When the ball is touching the boundary, grounded beyond the boundary, or being touched by a fielder who is himself either touching the boundary or grounded beyond it, it is dead and the batting side usually scores 4 or 6 runs for hitting the ball over the boundary. Because of this...

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From Academic Kids

Boundary has two distinct meanings in the sport of cricket.

Edge of the field

The boundary is the edge of the playing field, or the physical object marking the edge of the field, such as a rope or fence.

When the cricket ball is inside the boundary, it is in play. When the ball is touching the boundary, beyond the boundary, or being touched by a fielder who is himself either touching or beyond the boundary, it is out of play and the batting side usually scores 4 or 6 runs for hitting the ball out of play. Because of this rule, fielders near the boundary attempting to intercept the ball often flick the ball back in to the field of play rather than pick it up directly, and then return to pick it up after having slid into the boundary and then returned to the field.

4 or 6 runs

A “boundary” is also the scoring of a four or a six from a single delivery.

4 is scored if the ball bounces before touching or going...

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A traditional boundary rope.

Boundary has two distinct meanings in the sport of cricket;

(i) the edge or boundary of the playing field, and (ii) a manner of scoring runs.

Edge of the field

The

boundary

is the edge of the playing field, or the physical object marking the edge of the field, such as a rope or fence. Since the early 2000s the boundaries at professional matches are often a series of padded cushions carrying sponsors' logos strung along a rope. If the physical object is moved during play (such as by a fielder sliding into the rope) the boundary is considered to remain at the point where that object first stood.

When the cricket ball is inside the boundary, it is in play. When the ball is touching the boundary, grounded beyond the boundary, or being touched by a fielder who is himself either touching the boundary or grounded beyond it, it is out of play and the batting side usually scores 4 or 6 runs for hitting the ball out of...

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DM's Explanation of Cricket - Scoring Runs

Scoring Runs

Running

If a batsman hits the ball when it is bowled to him, he may attempt to score runs. He scores a run when both the batsmen run to the opposite wicket, swapping places. As soon as they both touch the ground behind the opposite popping crease, one run is scored, and they may return for another run immediately, if they wish. The fielding side attempts to prevent runs being scored by threatening to run out one of the batsmen.

Runs are credited to the batsman who hit the ball.

The batsmen generally carry their bats as they run, and turn for another run by touching the ground beyond the crease with an outstretched bat.

The batsmen stay at the wicket they end up at. So if they have run an odd number of runs, they have swapped ends and their striker/non-striker roles are swapped for the next ball (unless the ball just completed is the end of an over).

Being Run Out

If the batsmen...
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00:57

Glenn Maxwell says he is not a fan of the law change that permitted him to pull off one of the most brilliant outfield catches of the year during yesterday's fourth ODI at Headingley.

Maxwell, fielding at deep midwicket during the closing stages of England's series-squaring three-wicket win, dismissed Liam Plunkett after parrying the ball on the edge of the boundary, then jumping to complete the take in mid-air despite his last point of contact with the ground having taken place on the wrong side of the rope.

Prior to October 2013, the law had stated that the fielder needed to have started in the field of play and be grounded in bounds before securing the catch. That was amended by MCC to reward athleticism in the outfield but Maxwell, one of the best exponents of the art, said he didn't see the point of the change.

"I don't think it makes a whole lot of sense," Maxwell said after the Headingley match. "I think you should have to get...

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Law 32 (Caught)
1. Out Caught
The striker is out Caught if a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball, touches his bat without having previously been in contact with any member of the fielding side and is subsequently held by a fielder as a fair catch before it touches the ground.

2. Caught to take precedence
If the criteria of 1 above are met and the striker is not out Bowled, then he is out Caught, even though a decision against either batsman for another method of dismissal would be justified. Runs completed by the batsmen before the completion of the catch will not be scored. Note also Laws 21.6 (Winning hit or extras) and 42.17(b) (Penalty runs).

3. A fair catch
A catch shall be considered to have been fairly made if
(a) throughout the act of making the catch
(i) any fielder in contact with the ball is within the field of play. See 4 below.
(ii) the ball is at no time in contact with any object grounded beyond...

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We've been asking new converts to cricket to send in the questions about the game they don't quite understand.

We have been flooded with almost 1,000 emails - and answered them as best we can. Here is the final batch of answers.

For further queries, try our Academy or the Lord's website. Alternatively, for more detailed questions, email Test Match Special statistician Bill Frindall.

ANSWERS

What are the rules for calling a 'no ball'?
Mike Bennett, Epsom, Surrey

There are many circumstances in which an umpire may call a no ball. But the most common is when the bowler's front foot falls beyond the popping crease, which is the front line of the crease. The rules state some part of the foot must be on or behind the front line of the crease.

There are various other examples when the umpire will call a no ball:

If the batsmen run, for example, two on a no ball or wide, does the total increase by two or three runs?
Iain, London...

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The Basic Rules of Baseball

Click more info

Objectives of the Game.

Baseball is a game between two teams of nine players each, played on an enclosed field.

THE PLAYING FIELD. The field shall be laid out according to the instructions below;

The infield shall be a 90-foot square. (Youth leagues use a 60-foot square.)The outfield shall be the area between two foul lines formed by extending two sides of the square from home plate. The distance from home base to the nearest fence, stand or other obstruction on fair territory shall be 250 feet or more. A distance of 320 feet or more along the foul lines, and 400 feet or more to center field is preferable. The infield shall be graded so that the base lines and home plate are level. The pitcher's plate shall be 10 inches above the level of home plate and 60 feet 6 inches from home plate (Youth leagues use 46 feet.) The degree of slope from a point 6 inches in front of the pitcher's plate to a point 6 feet...

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The captain of the side winning the toss decides whether his team should bat or field.

The batting team posts one batsman at each wicket; the batsman taking the bowling first must keep one foot behind the popping crease, and his partner must remain entirely behind this crease.

The bowler and wicketkeeper face each other at opposite wickets. The fielders are positioned roughly in two rings around the striker.

Theoretically, an inner ring is placed to save one run, that is, to intercept or trap ground hits.

The outer ring is positioned to save runs that might occur from long hits to the boundary. Two umpires, one at each end of the pitch, rule on the game.

A ball is bowled from each wicket alternately in a series of six, sometimes eight, balls, called overs. When an over is completed, the wicketkeeper moves to the other wicket, and a different bowler (a starting fielder) begins the next over from the opposite end. A bowler’s objective (and the...

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THE GAME The game consists of seven innings. Whenever possible extra innings are played to break ties. However, when double headers or back-to-back games are scheduled and teams are unable to complete the game within the ninety minute time allowance, then the score at the conclusion of the last completed inning prior to the start of the next game is the official result (If balls and strikes are called then each batter is allowed a maximum of three balls and two strikes - this helps to keep the game moving at a reasonable pace). A team is allowed three outs per inning. A batter can not be called out on fouls unless the ball is legally caught. Base stealing is not permitted - base runners must remain on the base until a pitched ball is hit. Batters must reach base safely before a substitute runner can be employed. The batting team must supply a plate umpire to call balls and strikes as well as umpires for first and third base to call plays in the field. When captains agree to waive...

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D

Daisy-cutter -- See Shooter.

Dead ball -- When the ball is not in play, it is said to be 'dead'. The ball comes into play when the bowler starts his run-up, and becomes automatically dead when the umpire considers it to have 'finally settled' in the hands of the wicket-keeper or bowler, when a wicket falls, or when the ball reaches the boundary or when the umpire calls 'over' or 'time'. The umpire may call the ball dead at other times - for example, when the ball lodges in the batsman's clothing, or when a serious injury occurs to a player.

Declaration -- The decision of the batting captain to close his innings. Usually made in order to give his bowlers time to bowl the other side out to win the match, or delayed by twenty crucial minutes while the side's senior player struggles from 96 to 100.

Declaration bowler -- Inept bowler employed to allow the batting side to score quickly, usually in the hope of contriving a result...

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Forms Of Cricket

Cricket is played in two very distinct forms. The first is limited duration, in which a specific number of hours of playing time are allocated and each team plays two innings.
Test matches are played over five days, with six hours play each day. Each day's play is divided into three sessions of two hours each, with a 40 minute break between the first two session for lunch, and a 20 minute tea break between the last two sessions. A short drinks break is taken once an hour, or more often in very hot weather. Play usually goes from 11:00 local time to 18:00, although this may be varied if sunset occurs early. The scheduled close of play time is called stumps. Test matches are never played under artificial lighting.

Each team has two innings, usually played in alternating order. Each innings is over when either ten batsmen are out, or the captain of the batting side declares the innings closed (for strategic reasons, more...

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Polonia Cricket Club

The Basic Rules of Cricket

Cricket is played with two teams of eleven, with two umpires (referees) on an oval shaped field. The size of the field varies, but generally has a diameter of around 200 metres. A cricket bat is oblong shaped with a narrow handle. A full-sized bat is around 90 centimetres in length. A cricket ball is made of cork and covered with leather, and is then stitched up. A ball weighs around 10 ounces.

In the middle of the field is what is known as a pitch. A pitch is a hard, flat strip of dry ground around 18 metres long. Two batsman are at the pitch at a time, both at different ends, with one facing the delivery of the ball from the bowler. The bowler runs up to the pitch where he bowls the ball overarm with a straight arm. Further details on the correct bowling action can be found here.

Teams score by getting runs. A run is completed when a batsman hits the ball and then runs to the other end of the...

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I don't profess to know the first thing about cricket, but then that is the whole purpose of this page. A small insight into the world of cricket.

Cricket is a bat and ball team game with elaborate laws and traditions, certainly played in England before the end of the sixteenth century and now popular throughout the world.

It is played by two teams of eleven players on a field of unspecified size. Two three stump wickets are set 22 yards apart on a pitch. "Creases" are marked with white lines to help determine a fair delivery by the bowler and the successful completion of a run by the batsmen.

The ball is hard (usually made of cork and twine, encased in leather in two halves with a central seam around the circumference. This circumference must be between 224mm and 229mm (8.81 ins to 9ins) and the weight must be between 156 gms and 163 gms (5.5oz to 5.75oz). It is usually red in colour, however, occasionally white is used.

All...

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