Is it a runout if both the batsmen have reached the same end and at the same end the stump is broken?

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How runs are scored and teams win a match

In cricket, a run is running the length of the pitch, and is a basic means of scoring. A single run (known as a "single") is scored when a batsman (known as the "striker") has hit the ball with their bat and directed it away from the fielders so that they and their partner (the "non-striker") are able to run the length (22 yards) of the pitch.

Depending on how long it takes the fielding team to recover the ball, the batsmen may run more than once. Each completed run increments the scores of both the team and the striker. The team's total score in the innings is the aggregate of all its batsmen's individual scores plus any extras. To complete a run, both batsmen must ground their bats behind the popping crease at the other end of the pitch. Attempting a run carries a risk factor because either batsman can be run out, and thereby dismissed, if the fielding side can break the wicket with the ball before the batsman has completed...

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In the sport of cricket, a dismissal occurs when the batsman is out (also known as the fielding side taking a wicket and/or the batting side losing a wicket). At this point a batsman must discontinue batting and leave the field permanently for the innings. A bowling team dismisses (or bowls out) the entire batting team by dismissing 10 of the 11 players (assuming player(s) from the batting team have not retired hurt or are absent). As the players bat in pairs, when only one person is undismissed, it is not possible for them to bat any longer.

Once dismissed, a batsman cannot score any more runs in that innings. Thus dismissal is often the best way to control the runs scored in an innings, and prevent the batting side from either achieving their target score or posting a large total for the fielding side to follow in the next innings.

Additionally, in Test cricket it is usually necessary for a side fielding last to have dismissed ten players of the opposing team in...

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An Explanation of Cricket

Contents

Cricket is a team sport for two teams of eleven players each. A formal game of cricket can last anything from an afternoon to several days.

Although the game play and rules are very different, the basic concept of cricket is similar to that of baseball. Teams bat in successive innings and attempt to score runs, while the opposing team fields and attempts to bring an end to the batting team's innings. After each team has batted an equal number of innings (either one or two, depending on conditions chosen before the game), the team with the most runs wins.

(Note: In cricket-speak, the word "innings" is used for both the plural and the singular. "Inning" is a term used only in baseball.)

Cricket Ball: Hard, cork and string ball, covered with leather. A bit like a baseball (in size and hardness), but the leather covering is thicker and joined in two hemispheres, not in a tennis ball pattern. The seam is thus like an...
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With spinners, many of the facing batsmen with try to smash it for six, usually over the spinner's head. Try placing a fielder at deep mid-on or deep mid-off. When the batsman mistimes the shot, the fielder can take a nice, easy catch into the bread basket. Also, place fielders deep if the batsman smashes it elsewhere (e.g., deep square leg, fine leg, point and cover). Don't place all of your fielders near the boundary, scatter some up close near the wicky because the batsman could block some and take easy singles, and, every once an awhile the spinner bowls the perfect ball and the batter nicks the ball to the slips or silly mid-on and that gives you many wickets for your...

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Describe Cricket Rules here.

No, really, please do; it seems to be some organized form of Calvin Ball.

OK then, here's an outline Edit

The laws of Cricket are complex; but, to use video game terminology, at the core are game mechanics shared with baseball and softball:

only Hard Ball is Allowed in International Cricket,which is made of Leather [1] According to ICC International Cricket Council .

A strike zone, which the batter ("batsman", always, even if the batsman is female) defends from the pitcher ("bowler"). In baseball, this is an area loosely defined by the umpire. In cricket, it is the area defined by those three wooden sticks in the ground: the stumps, a.k.a the wicket. When the ball hits the stumps, that‘s an out. The batter hits the ball to score runs and is out if the hit is caught on the full. Further is usually better, and hitting the ball into the crowd brings the most runs with no possibility of getting out. Cricket allows...
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Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. The paler strip is the cricket pitch. The two sets of three wooden stumps on the pitch are the wickets. The two white lines are the creases.

Cricket is a bat-and-ball sport contested by two teams, usually of 11 players each. A cricket match is played on a grass field, roughly oval in shape, at the center of which is a flat strip of ground 22 yards (20.12 m) long, called a cricket pitch. At each end of the pitch is a construction of three parallel wooden stakes (known as stumps) driven vertically into the ground, with two small crosspieces (known as bails) laid across the top of them. This wooden structure is called a wicket. Cricket has drawn many comparisons to the American pastime of baseball, with both playing with innings, a bat and ball. While a home run is the best hit in baseball, the "sixer" in cricket gives six runs on one hit.

Cricket has been an established team sport for hundreds of years. It...

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Since nearly the entire civilized English-speaking world, except for the USA and most of Canada, is familiar with cricket and does not need this basic explanation, it is assumed that most of those who can profit from this explanation are citizens of the USA or Canada. And since those in the USA and Canada are often familiar with its cousin, baseball, it seems useful at times to make comparisons or contrasts to baseball in this explanation. Occasionally, when a cricket term is explained, its corresponding baseball term is given in parentheses and stars afterwards (*like this*). These terms correspond, but they are not equivalent, and the baseball term should not be used as a replacement for the cricket term when discussing cricket.

When a cricket term is first explained, it is put in quotation marks (""), which are generally not used when the term is further repeated.

This account has been simplified in order to give the basics of the game of cricket. Some of the...

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Background Information

SOS Children have produced a selection of wikipedia articles for schools since 2005. SOS Children works in 45 African countries; can you help a child in Africa?

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of 11 players on a field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 22-yard long pitch. One team bats, trying to score as many runs as possible while the other team bowls and fields, trying to dismiss the batsmen and thus limit the runs scored by the batting team. A run is scored by the striking batsman hitting the ball with his bat, running to the opposite end of the pitch and touching the crease there without being dismissed. The teams switch between batting and fielding at the end of an innings.

In professional cricket the length of a game ranges from 20 overs of six bowling deliveries per side to Test cricket played over five days. The Laws of Cricket are maintained by the International Cricket Council (ICC) and the...

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Run out is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket. It is governed by Law 38 of the Laws of cricket.

The rules

A batsman is out

Run out

if at any time while the ball is in play no part of his bat or person is grounded behind the popping crease and his wicket is fairly put down by the opposing side.

A batsman may be dismissed Run out whether or not a run is being attempted, even if the delivery is a no ball (i.e. not a fair delivery). There are a number of exceptions to this:

A batsman is not run out if he or his bat had been grounded behind the popping crease, but he subsequently leaves it to avoid injury, when the wicket is put down. A batsman is not run out if the ball has not been touched by a fielder (excluding a helmet worn by a fielder), after the bowler has entered his delivery stride, before the wicket is put down. (Therefore, the bowler may not run out the striker instead of bowling to him. This also means that the non-striker is...
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It will be evident by reading this article that cricket has a rich vocabulary. For an explanation of many of the terms used, see Glossary of cricket terms

Cricket is an outdoor game played by two teams of eleven players on a large grassy field in which the winning team is the one that scores the most "runs" when "batting". The team which is not batting is called the "fielding" team, whose most important member is the "bowler". The bowler "bowls" the "ball" to the "batsman" with the purpose of "dismissing" him from play. The batsman's purpose is to score as many runs as he can, using his "bat", before he is dismissed. There are various means of dismissal and when one batsman is "out", the next one succeeds him and so on until ten of the batsmen are out and the "innings" ends. The teams then change roles with the fielding team becoming the batting team and playing its innings.

Cricket originated in south-east England, probably as a children's game, sometime in or before...

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This section is in advanced English and is only intended to be a guide, not to be taken too seriously!
With dictionary look up. Double click on any word for its definition.

A

Agricultural shot

a swing across the line of the ball played without much technique. Often one that results in a chunk of the

pitch

being dug up by the

bat

. A type of a

slog

.


All out

when an

innings

is ended due to ten of the eleven

batsmen

on the batting side being either

dismissed

or unable to bat because of injury or illness.


All-rounder

a player adept at batting and bowling, or batting and wicket-keeping.


All-round spin

a player who can bowl both wrist spin and finger spin adeptly.


Anchor

a top-order batsman capable of batting for a long duration throughout the innings. Usually batsman playing at numbers 3 or 4 play such a role, especially if there is a batting collapse. An...

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Any questions?

Raphael

:

Cricket?

Nobody understands cricket! You gotta know what a crumpet is to understand cricket!


Casey

: I'll teach you. (

launches Raph into the air and into a trash can with one solid WHACK

) See? Six runs.

Describe Cricket Rules here.

No, really, please do;

it seems to be some organized form ofCalvinball

.

OK then, here's an outline.

The laws of

Cricket

are complex; but at the core are game mechanics shared with

Baseball

and softball:

A strike zone, which the batter ("batsman", always, even if the batsman is female) defends from the pitcher ("bowler"). In baseball, this is an area loosely defined by the umpire. In cricket, it is more well-defined: the area is that occupied by those three wooden sticks in the ground topped by the two short sticks across them: the stumps and bails, a.k.a the wicket. When the ball hits the stumps hard enough to dislodge one or both of the bails,...
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the term run out, used in equestrian sport, see refusal

Run out is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket. It is governed by Law 38 of the Laws of cricket.

The rules

A batsman is out Run out if at any time while the ball is in play no part of his bat or person is grounded behind the popping crease and his wicket is fairly put down by the opposing side.

A batsman may be dismissed Run out whether or not a run is being attempted, even if the delivery is a no ball (ie not a fair delivery). There are a number of exceptions to this:

(1) A batsman is not run out if he or his bat had been grounded behind the popping crease, but he subsequently leaves it to avoid injury, when the wicket is put down.

(2) A batsman is not run out if the ball has not been touched by a fielder (excluding a helmet worn by a fielder), after the bowler has entered his delivery stride, before the wicket is put down....

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Stumped is a method of dismissal in cricket.[1]

It is one of the ten ways in which a batsman can be out. The action of stumping can only be performed by a wicket-keeper and, according to the Laws of cricket, a batsman can be out stumped if:

the wicket-keeper puts down the wicket, while the batsman is: out of his ground (because he has moved down the pitch beyond the popping crease, usually in an attempt to hit the ball); and not attempting a run.

Being "out of his ground" is defined as not having any part of the batsman's body or his bat touching the ground behind the crease – i.e., if his bat is slightly elevated from the floor despite being behind the crease, or if his foot is on the crease line itself but not completely across it and touching the ground behind it, then he would be considered out (if stumped). One of the fielding team (such as the wicket-keeper himself) must appeal for the wicket by asking the umpire. The appeal is normally directed to the...

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Cricket is a team sport played between two teams of eleven. It is known for its rich terminology. Some terms are often thought to be arcane and humorous by those not familiar with the game.

This is a general glossary of the terminology used in the sport of cricket. Where words in a sentence are also defined elsewhere in this article, they appear in italics.

Table of Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Young Cricketer

. "Yes, I cocked one off the splice in the gully and the blighter gathered it."


Father

. "Yes, but how did you get out? Were you caught, stumped or bowled, or what?"


Cartoon from Punch, July 21, 1920.Agricultural shot a swing across the line of the ball (resembling a scything motion) played without much technique. Often one that results in a chunk of the pitch being dug up by the bat. A type of a slog. This term is thought to have originated in the city-country games in Australia, where the farmers...
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the insect, see Cricket (insect). For other uses, see Cricket (disambiguation).

A Test match between Australia and India in January 2004. The lighter strip is the cricket pitch. The men wearing black trousers on the far right are the umpires.

Cricket is a bat and ball sport, played between two teams of eleven players each. A cricket match is played on a grass field (which is usually roughly oval), in the centre of which is a flat strip of ground 22 yards (20.12 m) long, called a pitch. At each end of the pitch is a set of wooden stumps, called a wicket. A player from the fielding team (the bowler) propels a hard, fist-sized cork-centred leather ball from one wicket towards the other. The ball usually bounces once before reaching a player from the opposing team (the batsman), who defends the wicket from the ball with a wooden cricket bat. The batsman, if he or she...

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A run out is the most unfortunate thing for a batsman in cricket. It can remove a prolific batsman and change the course of the match. Cricket has eleven types of dismissal to dismiss a batsman, one of them is getting a batsman run out. Run out is more a batsman’s fault than the merit of bowler’s delivery. Run out is creating a trap which gets executed on your own. Nevertheless, no batsman likes to get run out, because it is like shooting oneself in the foot. But, for spectator run out is pure joy from a drama in the middle of the pitch.

If...

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2008/9 Schools Wikipedia Selection. Related subjects: Sports

Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. The paler strip is the cricket pitch. The two sets of three wooden stumps on the pitch are the wickets. The two white lines are the creases.

A Test match between South Africa and England in January 2005. The men wearing black trousers on the far right are the umpires. Test cricket, first-class cricket and club cricket are played in traditional white uniforms and with red cricket balls, while professional One-day cricket is usually played in coloured uniforms and with white balls.

Melbourne

Cricket Ground between Australia and India. The Australian batsmen are wearing yellow, while the fielding team, India, is wearing blue.">

A One Day International match at The Melbourne Cricket Ground between

Australia

and

India

. The Australian batsmen are wearing yellow, while the fielding team, India, is wearing blue.

Cricket is a...

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Learn more about Run out

Run out is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket. It is governed by Law 38 of the Laws of cricket.

A batsman is out Run out if at any time while the ball is in play no part of his bat or person is grounded behind the popping crease and his wicket is fairly put down by the opposing side.

A batsman may be dismissed Run out whether or not a run is being attempted, even if the delivery is a no ball (ie not a fair delivery). There are a number of exceptions to this:

(1) A batsman is not run out if he or his bat had been grounded behind the popping crease, but he subsequently leaves it to avoid injury, when the wicket is put down.

(2) A batsman is not run out if the ball has not been touched by a fielder (excluding a helmet worn by a fielder), after the bowler has entered his delivery stride, before the wicket is put down.

(3) A batsman is not given out Run out if he can be given out Stumped.

The batsman...

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A run-out is the most gut-wrenching of dismissals. It takes place in a segment of play that is removed from the central conflict between bat and ball, creating situations in which you often get executed for no fault of your own. Like any needless death, a run-out is surrounded by an explosive mix of circumstances that are fertile territory for drama, pathos, even farce.

If the intent of sport is to entertain and dramatise, what better way to achieve those aims than to take your most incendiary plotline and turn it up a notch? One run-out is tragic enough. Now imagine two run-out dismissals at the same time.

Here's a typical scenario: Batsman A fails to make his ground and gets run out from an outfielder's smart throw to the wicketkeeper. Batsman B, meanwhile, is also out of his ground (for any number of reasons - ball-watching, mishearing, miscalculating, or just having a plain old brain freeze). The wicketkeeper fires a throw to the bowler, who happens to be well...

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We've been asking new converts to cricket to send in the questions about the game they don't quite understand.

We have been flooded with almost 1,000 emails - and answered them as best we can. Here is the final batch of answers.

For further queries, try our Academy or the Lord's website. Alternatively, for more detailed questions, email Test Match Special statistician Bill Frindall.

ANSWERS

What are the rules for calling a 'no ball'?
Mike Bennett, Epsom, Surrey

There are many circumstances in which an umpire may call a no ball. But the most common is when the bowler's front foot falls beyond the popping crease, which is the front line of the crease. The rules state some part of the foot must be on or behind the front line of the crease.

There are various other examples when the umpire will call a no ball:

If the batsmen run, for example, two on a no ball or wide, does the total increase by two or three runs?
Iain, London...

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