Is it allowed to hit the ball twice to save the wicket?

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Definition

Cricket

adverb a mode of dismissal in which the batsman is given out ‘if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket’ (Law 34 § 1); the dismissal is entered in the scorebook as ‘hit the ball twice’ and is not credited to the bowler. If the batsman ‘lawfully’ hits the ball a second time (i.e. to prevent it hitting his stumps) he is not allowed to take any runs from the shot. ‘Hit the ball twice’ is one of the modes of dismissal that remain valid even in the case of a no-ball. The rule dates back to the earliest (1744) code of Laws: ‘If a Ball is nipp’d up, and he strikes it again wilfully, before it came to the wicket, it’s out’. Allowing for changes in wording, the rule has remained in force throughout the history of the...
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Welcome to the greatest game of all – Cricket. This site will help explain to an absolute beginner some of the basic rules of cricket.

Although there are many more rules in cricket than in many other sports, it is well worth your time learning them as it is a most rewarding sport.

Whether you are looking to play in the backyard with a mate or join a club Cricket-Rules will help you learn the basics and begin to enjoy one of the most popular sports in the world.

The game is ever popular, with many fans attending to watch their local and national teams, the craze is always growing. With a number of big tournaments like The Ashes, IPL League and the granddaddy of them all, the ICC World Cup Cricket 2019! The game of cricket is highly popular, and the number of cricket betting fans who place bets on their national and local teams is also growing.

Cricket is a game played with a bat and ball on a large field, known as a ground, between two teams of 11 players...

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Learn more about Hit the ball twice

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Hit the ball twice, or "double-hit", is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket.

[edit] Definition

Law 34 of the Laws of cricket provides that:

"(a) The striker is out Hit the ball twice if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. See 3 below and Laws 33 (Handled the ball) and 37 (Obstructing the field).

"(b) For the purpose of this Law, 'struck' or 'strike' shall include contact with the person of the striker."

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.

[edit]...

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Cricket Rules-

Umpire Signals

The rules of cricket have changed over the centuries. However, there are some basic rules that are still intact. Below are the rules of cricket.

Different ways a Batsmen is given out

There are a number of ways through which a batsman is given out. Wicket is a word that indicates that a bowler has gotten a batsman out.

Bowled

According to the cricket rule, a ball that has been bowled by a bowler hits the wicket of the striking batsman than he is given out provided one bail is removed by the ball. It does not matter if the ball has been in contact with the batsman’s body, gloves, bat or helmet. However, the ball should not touch another players body or umpire’s body before hitting the stumps.

Catch

According to the cricket rule, a batsman is give out if he hits a ball and the ball is out in the air i.e. the ball should not touch the ground. Even if the ball hits the bat,...

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Hit the ball twice, or "double-hit", is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket.

Definition

Law 34 of the...

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hit the ball twice, or "double-hit", is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket.

Definition

Law 34 of the Laws of cricket provides that:

"(a) The striker is out Hit the ball twice if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. See 3 below and Laws 33 (Handled the ball) and 37 (Obstructing the field).

"(b) For the purpose of this Law, 'struck' or 'strike' shall include contact with the person of the striker."

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.[1]

History

Cricket is often considered to be a rather gentle pastime but it has a history of extreme violence. In its early days, before the modern rules had universal effect, batsmen could go...

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Appealing. When the fielding team believes the batsman is out they have to appeal ‘How’s that?’ to the umpire at which point the umpire makes a decision. They should appeal before the bowler begins the run up for the next delivery or the bowling action for the delivery if there is no run up.

Fallen wicket. A fallen wicket or bails is one of the many situations that lead to a dismissal. The wicket or bail can be struck by a ball delivered by the bowler, the batsman’s bat or body, and a fielder holding the ball. Batsman out of crease. If any part of the batsmen’s bat or body is out of the ground behind the popping crease, they are out of their ground and can be run out or stumped. If both batsmen are out of their ground whichever popping crease each is closest to belongs to that batsman.

Methods of dismissal

Bowled. This is when the bowler delivers a ball that strikes the wicket and causes either a stump or bail to fall on the condition that the ball is legitimate...
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This section is in advanced English and is only intended to be a guide, not to be taken too seriously!
With dictionary look up. Double click on any word for its definition.

Cricket is a bat and ball sport.

The objective of the game is to score more runs (points) than the opposing team. It is a team game played between two teams of eleven players each. It originated in its modern form in England, and is popular mainly in the Commonwealth countries.

In the countries of South Asia , including India , Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, cricket is by far the most popular participatory and spectator sport. It is also a major sport in places such as England and Wales, Australia , New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the English -speaking Caribbean (called the West Indies).

The length of the game (called a match) can last six or more hours a day, for up to five days in Test matches (internationals) the numerous intervals for lunch and tea, and the...

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Australia vs India, Sydney Cricket Ground, January 2004. Note how the pitch being used is merely one of many that can be in various stages of preparation.

Cricket is a bat and ball game played between two teams of eleven (with a "12th man" on hand in case of injury), normally in the local summer season. At international level, it is played primarily in three forms: Test cricket (played over five days), one-day cricket (a shortened form of the game, with each team batting one innings of up to 50 overs), and recently innovated "Twenty20" matches (20 overs per side).

Cricket is also played at state, provincial and county levels, and traditional matches between club, village and public house teams are still played in summer on the village greens of England and the playing fields, parks, school grounds and even, on a less formal level, the streets, backyards and beaches of cricket playing nations. See Backyard cricket.

International Game

The International...

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Across the line - (of batting shot) in which the bat swings across the path of the ball, rather than along it. Risky, since it requires expert timing to make good contact.

See more ››

Agricultural shot - See Cow shot.

All out - The batting team is said to be all out when ten of its eleven batsmen are dismissed. The eleventh batsman cannot continue without a partner, and is recorded as 'not out' in the scorebook.

All-rounder - A player who can both bat and bowl, or occasionally, both bat and keep wicket. (Bowler-wicketkeeper all-rounders are a rare breed

Appeal - The fielding side's invitation to the umpire to give a batsman out, answered with an upraised finger or a call of 'not out'. Any member of the side may make an appeal, but if the fielding captain feels a batsman has been given out wrongly - for example, a catch not taken cleanly - he may withdraw the appeal and reinstate the batsman.

Arm ball - A finger-spinner's delivery bowled without...

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Batsman will be given out.

If the ball going to the stumps hit by the bat twice intentionally before the ball has been touched by a fielder, it will be given out by the umpire under the rule hitting the ball twice.In your scenario, the batsman is hitting the ball twice to save the wicket. So, it is an intentional act.

An example of this dismissal occurred in 1906 when John King, playing for Leicestershire against Surrey at The Oval tried to score a run after playing the ball twice to avoid getting bowled.
- Wikipedia

If the ball going to the stumps hit by the bat intentionally after the ball has been touched by a fielder, it will be given out by the umpire under the rule obstructing the field.

There is a famous example for this in an Indo-Pak match. Inzamam was given out for hitting the ball thrown by the fielder to save the...

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Hit the ball twice, or "double-hit", is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket.

Definition[edit]

Law 34 of the Laws of cricket states:[1]

Law 34 (Hit the ball twice)
1. Out Hit the ball twice
(a) The striker is not out if he deliberately hits the ball twice while the ball is still in play. If the ball hits the batsman or is struck by his bat and before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. See 3 below and Laws 33 (Handled the ball) and 37 (Obstructing the field).
(b) For the purpose of this Law, 'struck' or 'strike' shall include contact with the person of the striker.

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.[1]

History[edit]

Cricket is often considered to be a rather gentle pastime but it has a history of extreme violence. In its early days, before the modern...

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No. Hitting the ball twice intentionally is essentially an illegal action which may result in the batsman being given out Hit the ball twice under Law 34.1:

The striker is out Hit the ball twice if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person [...].

The only instance where the batsman may strike it again legally is when he does so solely to protect his wicket, as described by Law 34.3:

Solely in order to guard his wicket and before the ball has been touched by a fielder, the striker may lawfully strike the ball a second or subsequent time with his bat [...].

No runs are scored by the batsman when the ball has been hit...

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Hit wicket is a method of dismissal in the sport of cricket. This method of dismissal is governed by Law 35 of the laws of cricket. The striker is out "hit wicket" if, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, his wicket is put down by his bat or his person. The striker may do this whilst preparing to receive or receiving a delivery or in setting off for his first run after playing the delivery. In simple language, if the striking batsman knocks the bails off the stumps or uproots the stumps, while attempting to hit the ball or take off for a run, he is out hit wicket.

This method is the sixth most common method of dismissal after caught, bowled, leg before wicket, run out and stumped. It is significantly rarer than any of these, which constitute the five conventional methods, but still much more common than the other five (timed out, handled the ball, obstructing the field, retired out and hit the ball twice), which are extremely...

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Cricket - How To Get Out


(h2g2 - Cricket - How To Get Out)

The Basics

Before we tell you how to get yourself out, we'll need to know some basics.

Appealing

A batsman cannot be given out unless a member of the fielding side 'appeals' to the umpire and, as Law 27.4 says, a simple shout of 'how's that?' will do perfectly. Umpires must respond to each appeal, either by raising a finger above the head to show the batsman's innings is over or by a verbal 'not out'. The fielding captain may withdraw the appeal if he is feeling generous, and umpires have the right to change their decision 'providing that such an alteration is made promptly1'. A batsman can also 'walk' without waiting for the umpire to give him out, and this behaviour is generally encouraged - a man who faintly nicks the ball to the wicketkeeper and walks off, knowing he is guilty, is generally better respected than one who hangs around waiting for the dreaded finger.
Umpires...

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No. A batsman will not be out if he is stumped on a free hit. According to an article on Cricinfo:

24.2 Free Hit after a foot-fault no ball... the delivery following a no ball called for a foot fault (Law 24.5) shall be a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it. If the delivery for the free hit is not a legitimate delivery (any kind of no ball or a wide ball) then the next delivery will become a free hit for whichever batsman is facing it.

For any free hit, the striker can be dismissed only under the circumstances that apply for a no ball, even if the delivery for the free hit is called wide ball.


As it is clear that on the free hit, only dismissals that would be accounted for are the ones which can also be out in a no-ball situation. According to the official laws of cricket set by the Marylebourne Cricket Club (and followed by the ICC), the only ways to get out on a no-ball are:

When No ball has been called, neither batsman shall be out...

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The Laws of Cricket | No Ball

1. Mode of delivery

(a) The umpire shall ascertain whether the bowler intends to bowl right handed or left handed, over or round the wicket, and shall so inform the striker.

It is unfair if the bowler fails to notify the umpire of a change in his mode of delivery. In this case the umpire shall call and signal No ball.

(b) Underarm bowling shall not be permitted except by special agreement before the match.

2. Fair delivery - the arm

For a delivery to be fair in respect of the arm the ball must not be thrown. See 3 below

Although it is the primary responsibility of the striker’s end umpire to assess the fairness of a delivery in this respect, there is nothing in this Law to debar the bowler’s end umpire from calling and signalling No ball if he considers that the ball has been thrown.

(a) If, in the opinion of either umpire, the ball has been thrown, he shall call and signal No ball and, when the...

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