Traveling rules in basketball

1

Basketball is a team sport and fun-filled and enthusiastic recreational activity. This sport can be played indoors or outdoors, such as water basketball or beach basketball. The history of basketball reveals that this sport was invented in 1891, by Dr. James Naismith, a Canadian physical education student and an instructor at the YMCA Training School in Springfield, USA. Within a short span of time, the game gained popularity and was being played all over the world. Czechoslovakia, Argentina, Latvia, Greece, Italy, Romania, Portugal and Switzerland together established the International Basketball Federation in 1932. Basketball was introduced to the Olympics, in 1936.

Basketball is played between two teams, with five players on each team. A standard basketball court is a rectangular, wooden surface that measures 28 x 15 meters, with two baskets at the opposite ends. It is played in four quarters of 10-12 minutes. The main idea of the game is to throw the ball into the...

0 0
2
[FormatException: Input string was not in a correct format.] System.Number.StringToNumber(String str, NumberStyles options, NumberBuffer& number, NumberFormatInfo info, Boolean parseDecimal) +14300177 System.Number.ParseInt32(String s, NumberStyles style, NumberFormatInfo info) +305 IPLocationManager.ConvertIPAddressToIPNumber(String DottedIP) +456 IPLocationManager.GetClientLocation(HttpRequest request) +210 CheckSubdomain.CheckSoccerOrFootball(HttpRequest request) +279 Guides_GuideDetail.Page_Load(Object sender, EventArgs e) +1004 System.Web.UI.Control.LoadRecursive() +71 System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)...
0 0
3

Subscribe for FREE and Get 3 eBooks…

Just for subscribing to our free newsletter you’ll get these 3 eBooks for free… 72 Basketball Drills & Coaching Tips – 136 page eBook. 21 Basketball Tips & Tricks for Players – 20 page eBook. 32 Winning Basketball Plays – 96 page eBook.

Plus you’ll get ALL updates to this website delivered to your inbox for free. Over 100,000 other coaches, players, & parents have already subscribed.

We will never send you spam or share your email address, guaranteed!


Close
FREE! Get 72 of our favorite basketball drills and 32 of our favorite basketball plays.

The rules of basketball, thankfully, are fairly straightforward. However, for the younger players, some rules can be easily forgotten. The three-second rule addressing how long an offensive player can be in the key before clearing out is a good example.

Once you have taught the rules of the game to your team, there is a simple...

0 0
4

In basketball, traveling (travelling in Commonwealth English) is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball moves one or both of their feet illegally. Most commonly, a player travels by illegally moving his or her pivot foot or taking three or more steps without dribbling the ball. A similar rule with the same name exists in the related sports of netball and korfball.

Traveling is sometimes also called "walking", "steps", "deucing", or "carrying," predominantly in a streetball atmosphere.

In basketball

Definitions

NCAA

Section 72. Traveling[1]

Art. 1. A player who catches the ball with both feet on the playing court may pivot, using either foot. But cannot stand on tip toes and come down.

Art. 2. A player who catches the ball while moving or dribbling may stop and establish a pivot foot as follows:

a. When both feet are off the playing court and the player lands:

1. Simultaneously on both...

0 0
5

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball illegally moves one or both of his feet. Most commonly, a player travels by illegally moving his pivot foot or taking too many steps without dribbling the ball.

Traveling is sometimes also called "walking" or "steps."

Definition

NCAA

The following is quoted from the 2009 NCAA Men's & Women's Basketball Rules.

Rule 4, Section 50. Pivot: Art. 1. A pivot takes place when a player who is holding the ball steps once or more than once in any direction with the same foot, while the other foot, called the pivot foot, is kept at its point of contact with the playing court. Rule 4, Section 66. Travel: Art. 1. Traveling occurs when a player holding the ball moves a foot or both feet in any direction in excess of prescribed limits described in this rule. Art. 2. A player who catches the ball with both feet on the...
0 0
6

Hello, I am just curious on a few rules of traveling in basketball especially the concept of "picking up your dribble"

First is what exactly counts as "picking up your dribble"? I know you are allowed two steps after you pick up your dribble but what defines the moment when it happens?

Rajon Rondo Highlights vs.Los Angeles Lakers 3/11/2012 - 24 points - Red eye game - YouTube

I am a Rondo fan, but in this particular play he takes one or two steps as the basketball hangs behind him after he dribbles, and then picks it up and takes his two steps. Would this be legal in a high school or college game? Couldn't you if you had the ball control and the arm length (as Rondo does), after that last dribble take several steps to better position your body before picking up your dribble for two steps?

Second situation is when you take your last dribble/step at the same time before taking your two steps. This is usually how some people do spin moves or "windmill...

0 0
7

In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball moves one or both of their feet illegally. Most commonly, a player travels by illegally moving his or her pivot foot or taking three or more steps without dribbling the ball. A similar rule with the same name exists in the related sports of netball and korfball.

Traveling is sometimes also called, predominantly in a streetball game, "walking" or "steps."

In basketball[edit]

Definitions[edit]

NCAA[edit]

Section 72. Traveling[1]

Art. 1. A player who catches the ball with both feet on the playing court may pivot, using either foot. But cannot stand on tip toes and come down.

Art. 2. A player who catches the ball while moving or dribbling may stop and establish a pivot foot as follows:

a. When both feet are off the playing court and the player lands: 1. Simultaneously on both feet, either may be the pivot foot; 2. On one foot...
0 0
8

They were farm girls — sturdy sharecroppers’ daughters — and they were obsessed with basketball.

In spare minutes between feeding chickens and working the shriveling cotton fields, they’d practice barefoot on dirt, doing their darndest to throw whatever stood for a ball into a splintery peach basket.

Then, on Friday nights at the high school gym, they’d lace up their canvas shoes, tuck their sackcloth dresses into knee-length bloomers, and play their hearts out as their friends and neighbors hollered.

The farm girls of Oklahoma loved basketball for the game itself, with no idea, at the height of the Great Depression, that it could ever lift them out of the dust.

But for a talented and lucky few in the early 1930s, it would do just that, starting with the very moment that a broad-shouldered stranger in a black suit and a flattop haircut would show up at their games.

He was Samuel Foster Babb, the charismatic basketball coach of tiny Oklahoma...

0 0
9
National Federation of High Schools (NFHS) National Collegiate Athletic Association Rule 4/Definitions, Section 50. Pivot A pivot takes place when a player who is holding the ball steps once or more than once in any direction with the same foot, while the other foot, called the pivot foot, is kept at its point of contact with the playing court. Rule 4: Definitions, Section 44: Traveling Rule 4/Definitions, Section 68: Traveling Traveling (running with the ball) is moving a foot or feet in any direction in excess of prescribed limits while holding the ball. The limits on foot movements are as follows:
Art. 1. Traveling occurs when a player holding the ball moves a foot or both feet in any direction in excess of prescribed limits described in this rule. ART. 1 . . . A player who catches the ball with both feet on the floor, may pivot, using either foot. When one foot is lifted, the other is the pivot foot. Art. 2. A player who catches the ball with both...
0 0
10

Traveling is one of the most common -- and misunderstood -- rules in all of basketball. The travel rule is intended to prevent players from gaining an advantage by moving with the ball without dribbling. Traveling is a violation in basketball and is penalized by awarding the ball to the opposing team out of bounds closest to where the travel occurred.

The basic concept of traveling is based on the “pivot foot.” Once a player receives the ball or picks up his dribble, he is allowed to move one foot, while the other foot has to remain on the floor as a pivot foot. This foot is allowed to rotate, as long as the ball of the foot remains on the floor at all times. A travel occurs when the player lifts the pivot foot and then returns it to the floor before releasing the ball on a pass or a shot. For instance, if a player receives a pass and jumps with both feet to attempt a shot and returns to floor without shooting, it is considered a...

0 0
11

4.44 SITUATION A: A1 attempts to catch the ball while running rapidly. A1 muffs the ball, but succeeds in securing it before it strikes the floor. A1 then begins a dribble, taking several steps between the time the ball was first touched until it was caught. RULING: There has been no violation provided A1, after catching the ball, released the ball to start the dribble before the pivot foot was lifted from the floor. (4-15).

4.44 SITUATION B: A1 attempts a try after ending the dribble. The try does not touch the backboard, the rim or any other player. A1 runs and is able to catch the ball before it strikes the floor. Is this traveling? RULING: No. When A1 recovered his/her own try, A1 could either dribble, pass or try again. There was no team control after the ball was released on a try. (4-12; 4-41).

4.44.2 SITUATION A: Dribbler A1 catches the ball with the right foot touching the floor and then jumps off that foot and alights on both feet simultaneously: (a) with...

0 0
12

After playing the first two games of the NBA Finals in San Antonio, the Spurs and Miami Heat will resume their series with Game 3 in Miami on Tuesday. The league will tell you that today, Monday, is a travel day. But that’s only partly true: Every day in the NBA is now a travel day.

Traveling. Steps. Walking. Does the violation even exist in the basketball rule book any longer? And if it does, why has the NBA, or its officials, opted to utterly neglect enforcing it? Early in Game 2—and you can watch the replay here, courtesy of the folks at ESPN (0:30)—LeBron James caught a pass just outside the left elbow, took one dribble and then, after he picked up the ball, took one, two, three steps before laying the ball into the peach basket, which in any basketball, in any era, is traveling.

ESPN’s Robert Flores then noted that the refs may have missed a whistle on the play. “[LeBron] wanted the and-one but did not get it,” said Flores, as the replay showed James gesturing at...

0 0
13

By Todd Von Sossan

The prescribed limits described for traveling differslightly depending on if the player who catches the ball has both feet on the playing court, one foot on the playing court, or is airborne and has no feet on the playing court. We should all read, review, study, and fully understand the written rule of traveling, but here are a few simple points to keep in mind when judging whether or not a player has committed a traveling violation.

Here are some key points in regards to traveling violations:

A player cannot travel unless he is HOLDING the basketball, not dribbling, muffing, fumbling, etc. He must be holding the ball and then move his feet / pivot foot in excess of the prescribed limits to constitute a traveling violation. When a player catches a ball in your area, immediately identify his pivot foot, if he has established one. If he picks up his right foot, then his left foot is his pivot foot (say to yourself,...
0 0
14

RULE NO. 10-VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES


Section I-Free Throw

a. After the ball is placed at the disposal of a free throw shooter, his attempt shall be within 10 seconds in such a way that the ball enters the basket or touches the ring before it is touched by a player. The shooter shall be within that part of the free throw circle behind the free throw line.

b. A player shall not touch the ball or basket while the ball is on or within the basket.

c. A player who occupies a free throw lane space shall not touch the floor on or across the free throw lane line, nor shall any player 'back out' more than 3' from the free throw lane line. A player who does not occupy a free throw lane space must remain behind the three-point line. This restriction applies until the ball leaves the free thrower's hands.

d. The free throw shooter may not cross the plane of the free throw line until the ball touches the basket ring, backboard, or the free throw ends.

e....

0 0
15

25 Misunderstood Rules in High School Basketball

1. There is no 3-second count between the release of a shot and the control of a rebound, at which time a new count starts. Comment: We officials know this, however……..

2. A player can go out of bounds, and return inbounds and be the first to touch the ball l! Comment: This is not the NFL. You can be the first to touch a ball if you were out of bounds. However, you must establish yourself as inbounds. “Something in, nothing out”.

3. There is no such thing as “over the back”. There must be contact resulting in advantage/disadvantage. Do not put a tall player at a disadvantage merely for being tall! Comment: See comment #1…

4. “Reaching” is not a foul. There...

0 0
16

The answer to all questions regards the "jump stop". Here is a summary of the traveling rule, which includes this concept:

1. A player who catches the ball with both feet on the floor may pivot, using either foot. When one foot is lifted, the other is the pivot foot. 2. A player who catches the ball while moving or dribbling may stop and establish a pivot foot as follows: a. If both feet are off the floor and the player lands; (1) Simultaneously on both feet, either foot may be the pivot. (2) On one foot followed by the other, the first foot to touch is the pivot. (3) On one foot, the player may jump off that foot and simultaneously land on both. Neither foot can be a pivot in this case. b. If one foot is on the floor; (1) It is the pivot when the other foot touches in a step. (2) The player may jump off that foot and simultaneously land on both. Neither foot can be a pivot in this case. 3. After coming to a stop and establishing a pivot foot: a. The pivot foot may be...
0 0