What technology is used to measure the speed of ball delivered?

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check out this one:

The Cricket ball that measures its own speed

April 18, 2008 In the game of cricket, the express bowler holds a special place – the fastest of the fast deliver the ball at around 100mph – it’s scary to watch, because at those speeds, 5.75 ounces (163 g) of leather and cork can kill you and rearing fast balls aimed at the throat are a commonly used method of unsettling the batsman. In most English-speaking countries, the names of the fastest, most intimidating bowlers down the years have become part of common knowedge - Harold Larwood, Typhoon Tyson, Wes Hall, Jeff Thomson, and more recently, Shoiab Akhtar and Brett Lee. Since the first radar guns were used to measure ball speed, the public has been fascinated with the ongoing quest to be labelled the “fastest bowler in the world” fought out between Lee and Akhtar. Now you no longer need a radar gun to get an accurate reading of your speed with a new cricket ball produced that puts the measuring technology...

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The principle used is the same used by interceptors and traffic signals to check if someone is over speeding.
Doppler shift.
When a source producing any sort of waves is moving away or towards you (the observer) , the frequency of the wave appears to have changed (Note, that in reality the frequency is the number of waves created per second by the source which actually remains the same) due to the motion of the source.
Here is nice pictorial representation

You can see the waves are stacked up ahead of the car because the car is moving in that direction.

I will not go into the math, but if you know what the velocity is, you can calculate the apparent frequency. Or if you know what the apparent frequency is, you can calculate what the velocity is. And that is the whole idea used here.

The device in general is called a radar gun, which uses radio waves or micro wave signals and these signals are reflected off the object (whose speed you want to...

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Methods of Measuring Speed in Cricket

Cricket is a classical game that involves elements like batting, bowling and fielding and all of them have almost equal importance. Bowling is considered to be a vital component of cricket that brings the ball into the game at speed. The game of gentlemen has seen some the fastest bowlers who put a lot of effort in generating great speed of the ball. Shoaib Akhtar, Brett lee , Coutney Walsh and many others had been the fastest bowlers of all time. Any of you ever wondered how speed is measured in Cricket? What are the methods of measuring speed in Cricket? Well, after reading this article, all of you will be capable of answering this question.

There are two methods by which a bowling speed is measured in the cricket.

You may also like to read: Top 15 Fastest Bowlers at Present in Cricket

#1 Radar Gun

Measuring speed of cricket ball by Radar Gun is similar to measuring the speed of moving car. It...

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Did you know that until 19th century, all bowlers used to ball underhand? It was in 1862, when a British player left the field in protest over a 'No Ball' call for raising the arm over the shoulder for delivering a ball.

As a result, a regulation was passed to allow bowlers bowl overhand. The rule changed the game dramatically as the overhand bowling made it more complex for the batsman to judge the movement of the ball.

And till then Cricket has come a long way with several modifications with rules affecting the nature of game play. And now Cricket, like any other internationally acclaimed game integrates so many technologies to get accurate results. Of course, most of them still outrightly gets rejected by the purists. But still, several technological amendments are slowly becoming indispensible part of the game.

After studying hundreds of references on the evolution of Cricket we find out key technological implementation in the game of the gentleman's. Here...

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Cricket is considered to be a gentleman’s game that has a class in itself. The game of cricket has elements like batting, bowling and fielding and all of these elements has an equal importance. Bowling is considered to be important part of cricket that brings the ball in to the game at the great speed. The game of Cricket has seen some the fastest bowlers and all those bowlers put a lot of effort in generating that much speed of the ball. Shoaib Akhtar, Brett lee , Coutney Walsh and many others had been the fastest bowlers of all time. The question comes that how is the bowling speed measured in cricket when the bowlers bowl at such a fast speed. There are two methods by which a bowling speed is usually measured in the cricket.

How Is the Bowling Speed Measured in Cricket

Radar Gun

Measuring the speed of the bowl by a radar is similar to measuring the speed of the moving car. This gun consists of both a receiver and a transmitter. The way it works...

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When throwing a baseball, it isn't the pitcher's muscle mass that determines how fast the ball goes, but rather it is the amount of torque the pitcher puts on his body. The elite flame-throwing pitchers can maximize this effort, and throw a baseball at speeds in excess of 100 mph (44.7 m/s). It seems as if there is an imaginary boundary, preventing pitchers from going much past that point. However, this boundary isn't as imaginary as one would think. The reason that pitchers struggle to throw a ball faster than that, is because once you get to that speed, additional muscle mass doesn't help throw a baseball any faster. It has been calculated that bout 80 newton-meters of torque act on a pitchers elbow when he throws it at 100 mph. If a person were to put any more torque on their elbow, they would probably snap. Hence, pitchers usually are unable to go past that point.

It is uncertain what the fastest pitcher ever thrown has been, but there have been many claims....

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April 18, 2008 In the game of cricket, the express bowler holds a special place – the fastest of the fast deliver the ball at around 100mph – it’s scary to watch, because at those speeds, 5.75 ounces (163 g) of leather and cork can kill you and rearing fast balls aimed at the throat are a commonly used method of unsettling the batsman. In most English-speaking countries, the names of the fastest, most intimidating bowlers down the years have become part of common knowedge - Harold Larwood, Typhoon Tyson, Wes Hall, Jeff Thomson, and more recently, Shoiab Akhtar and Brett Lee. Since the first radar guns were used to measure ball speed, the public has been fascinated with the ongoing quest to be labelled the “fastest bowler in the world” fought out between Lee and Akhtar. Now you no longer need a radar gun to get an accurate reading of your speed with a new cricket ball produced that puts the measuring technology inside the ball so any budding Brett Lee can work on their...

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Camera system Hawk-Eye at the

Kremlin Cup

tennis tournament on 20 October 2012, Moscow

Hawk-Eye is a complex computer system used officially in numerous sports such as cricket, tennis, Gaelic football, badminton, hurling, Rugby Union, association football and volleyball, to visually track the trajectory of the ball and display a record of its statistically most likely path as a moving image.[1]

Hawk-Eye was developed in the United Kingdom by Paul Hawkins. The system was originally implemented in 2001 for television purposes in cricket. The system works via six (sometimes seven) high-performance cameras, normally positioned on the underside of the stadium roof, which track the ball from different angles. The video from the six cameras is then triangulated and combined to create a three-dimensional representation of the trajectory of the ball. Hawk-Eye is not infallible and is accurate to within 5 millimetres (0.19 inch) but is generally trusted as an impartial...

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Not even the biggest hitters in tennis are a match for the IBM radar gun used at Wimbledon.

The radars measure the speed of service throughout the tournament.

However fast the players serve, the IBM gun can always match the speed - even if their opponents can't.

How does a radar gun work?
During Wimbledon, two specially designed radar sensors are positioned behind the baseline at either end of the centre court, as well as the number one, two, three, 13 and 18 courts.

Once a player strikes the ball, the radar guns detect its speed.

The information is flashed up on the court-side screens.

Details are also automatically recorded on IBM's central tournament database.

Back to...

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By Carl Valle

Figure 1: The Australian company Kinetic Performance boasts a decade of experience working with the best teams in the world and have committed to updating their software for the demands of North American teams, not just Europe, NZ, and their backyard.

A Numbers Game or Time to Slow Down?

Over Labor Day weekend, a few coaches asked me about the use of barbell velocity tools that are out on the market now. In the early 2000s, Tendo was all the rage and stayed on top until a few years ago when the Australian product Gymaware started to hit North America. Linear Positional Transducers are over 20 years old and are not new to Europe, so why the rise in popularity again now? Besides my articles promoting accurate training, an increase in wanting more data is because training is getting a big wake up call and audit with validation. Last year I read Bryan Mann’s guide to Velocity Based Training (VBT), and it was a nice way to introduce and outline the...

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An anemometer is a device used for measuring the speed of wind, and is also a common weather station instrument. The term is derived from the Greek word anemos, which means wind, and is used to describe any wind speed measurement instrument used in meteorology. The first known description of an anemometer was given by Leon Battista Alberti in 1450.

History[edit]

The anemometer has changed little since its development in the 15th century. Leon Battista Alberti (1404–1472) is said to have invented the first mechanical anemometer around 1450. In following centuries, numerous others, including Robert Hooke (1635–1703), developed their own versions, with some being mistakenly credited as the inventor. In 1846, John Thomas Romney Robinson (1792–1882) improved upon the design by using four hemispherical cups and mechanical wheels. In 1926, Canadian meteorologist John Patterson (January 3, 1872 – February 22, 1956) developed a three-cup anemometer, which was improved by...

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