Who is eligible to vote in the Baseball Hall of Fame election?

1

To add on Ben Miller's answer, which is absolutely correct, the website Deadspin actually legally bought out one BBWAA member to claim the member's vote as Deadspin's vote. This member's name has not been released publicly yet.

What will happen is that Deadspin will turn the vote over to the Deadspin readers who will then, as a mass, vote on who they want inducted into the Hall Of Fame. Whoever the readers choose, the BBWAA member will then vote for the reader's chosen player.

So in this case, A BBWAA member is still voting for a player, but his/her vote is being sourced by readers from a website. The member's name will be published after the vote and will likely result in a firing of that person. Due to this obvious career ending dilemma, many think that this BBWAA member is at the end of his/her career.

You can read more about this in this...

0 0
2

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2016 proceeded according to rules most recently amended in 2015. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 6, 2016.

Ken Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza were elected to the Hall of Fame. The Pre-Integration Committee, the last of three new voting committees established during an earlier rules change in 2010 to replace the more broadly defined Veterans Committee, convened in December 2015 to select from a ballot of players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport prior to 1947 – called the "Pre-Integration Era" by the Hall of Fame – but failed to select any inductees.[1][2]

The Hall of Fame induction ceremonies was held on July 24, 2016 at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, with commissioner Rob Manfred presiding. On the day before the actual induction ceremony,...

0 0
3

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2012 proceeded according to rules most recently revised in July 2010. As in the past, the Baseball Writers' Association of America voted by mail to select from a ballot of recently retired players, with results announced on January 9, 2012. The Golden Era Committee, the second of three new era committees established by the July 2010 rules change, replacing the Veterans Committee, convened early in December 2011 to select from a Golden Era ballot of retired players and non-playing personnel who made their greatest contributions to the sport between 1947 and 1972, called the "Golden Era" by the Hall of Fame.[1]

The induction class consists of Ron Santo, elected by the Golden Era Committee,[2] and Barry Larkin, elected by the BBWAA.[3]

The induction ceremonies were held on July 22, 2012 at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.[4] On July 21, the Hall presented two awards for media excellence—its own Ford C. Frick Award for...

0 0
4
COOPERSTOWN, NY – JULY 29: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is seen during the Baseball Hall of Fame weekend on July 29, 2006 in Cooperstown, New York. (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images) " data-medium-file="https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=300" data-large-file="https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=782" src="https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=782&h=522" srcset="https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=782&h=522 782w, https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=1564&h=1044 1564w, https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=150&h=100 150w, https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=300&h=200 300w, https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=768&h=512 768w, https://heavyeditorial.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/71537880.jpg?w=1024&h=683 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 782px) 100vw,...
0 0
5

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2007 proceeded according to revised rules enacted in 2001. The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players. The Veterans Committee held an election with two ballots: the biennial election for players retired over 20 years, and the quadrennial election for non-players (managers, umpires and executives), the first since 2003.

Induction ceremonies in Cooperstown were held July 29 with Commissioner Bud Selig presiding.

BBWAA election

The BBWAA was again authorized to elect players active in 1987 or later, but not after 2001; the ballot, announced on November 27, 2006, included candidates from the 2006 ballot who received at least 5% of the vote but were not elected, along with selected players, chosen by a screening committee, whose last appearance was in 2001. All 10-year members of the BBWAA were eligible to vote.

Voters were instructed to cast votes for up...

0 0
6

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2009 proceeded according to revised rules enacted in 2001 and further revamped in 2007. The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players. In keeping with the 2007 rules changes, the Veterans Committee held an election for players who were active in the years 1943 to 1987, but not before or after that period; for the fourth consecutive election cycle, this election produced no selections. An election to select from among players who were active prior to 1943 was conducted by a separate Veterans Committee panel of 12 Hall of Famers, writers, and baseball historians, chosen by the Hall of Fame's Board of Directors, and this election produced the first Veterans Committee selection since Template:Bhofy. An election to select managers, umpires and executives was held for the Template:Bhofy inductions; the next such election will be held prior to the Template:Bhofy inductions. Induction...

0 0
7

The Hall of Fame election results show isn’t quite ready for prime time, but this year, the institution, the BBWAA and MLB Network have moved the announcement of the voting results from its previous 2 p.m. ET time slot to 6 p.m. in hopes of reaching a wider audience. What follows here is my quick guide to five things to watch for. For links to my profiles of any of the 32 candidates, see here, and for my virtual ballot, see here.

1. Ken Griffey Jr. could go where no man has gone before

No candidate has ever been elected unanimously via the BBWAA ballot, not even Babe Ruth, whose 95.1% share of the vote in the inaugural election in 1936 merely tied Honus Wagner for second place behind Ty Cobb, who received 98.2%. The fact that none of those greats swept the field established an unwritten rule among the electorate that has held for over 3/4ths of a century: nobody, not even Willie Mays (94.7%) or Hank Aaron (97.8%) gets in with 100%.

The reasons vary. Apart from...

0 0
8

Hillary Clinton won the popular vote. But Donald Trump won the Electoral College. What would happen if we got rid of the Electoral College? Or if we switched to proportional representation?

It’s hard to predict with certainty how our political elections would look under different rules because the process of determining a president has been effectively unchanged over the last two centuries. Yes, there is considerable benefit to rule consistency. But in an empirical sense, it would be enlightening to have seen America’s voting rules change over time and the impacts of those changes on the process of selecting the president.

But in a broader sense, any variation in election rules — for president, for student body treasurer, or for anything else — allows us to examine the rules’ impact on voting outcomes.

Fortunately for us, there was another election result announced recently that has witnessed some changes in its voting procedure over the years — the annual...

0 0
9

BBWAA election

On July 26, 2014, the Hall announced changes to the rules for election for recently retired players, reducing the number of years a player will be eligible to be on the ballot from 15 years to 10. Three candidates presently on the BBWAA ballot ( Lee Smith, Don Mattingly and Alan Trammell) in years 10-15 were grandfathered into this system and retained their previous 15 years of eligibility. In addition, BBWAA members who were otherwise eligible to cast ballots were required to complete a registration form and sign a code of conduct before receiving their ballots, and the Hall made public the names of all members who cast ballots (but not their individual votes) when it announced the election results.[7] The code of conduct specifically states that the ballot is non-transferable, a direct reaction to Dan Le Batard's actions in the 2014 balloting process. Violation of the code of conduct will result in a lifetime ban from BBWAA voting.[8]

The ballot...

0 0
10

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 2009 proceeded according to revised rules enacted in 2001 and further revamped in 2007. The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) held an election to select from among recent players. In keeping with the 2007 rules changes, the Veterans Committee held an election for players who were active in the years 1943 to 1987, but not before or after that period; for the fourth consecutive election cycle, this election produced no selections. An election to select from among players who were active prior to 1943 was conducted by a separate Veterans Committee panel of 12 Hall of Famers, writers, and baseball historians, chosen by the Hall of Fame's Board of Directors, and this election produced the first Veterans Committee selection since 2001. An election to select managers, umpires and executives was held for the 2008 inductions; the next such election will be held prior to the 2010...

0 0
11

Pro

Resolution: As Pro I will show why it is unjustified to deny a baseball Hall of Fame candidate a vote for induction based on that players steroid history. Con must show why it is justified for steroid users to be denied a Hall of Fame vote.

This is a debate about the broader context of this issue and does not center on any one specific example.

Steroids: Includes all banned substances recognized as performance enhancing drugs. (Steroids just sounds so much more controversial)

National Hall of Fame: located at 25 Main Street, Cooperstown, NY 13326
http://baseballhall.org...


Challenger: Please be serious, no semantics. Please make sure you can commit to finishing this debate prior to accepting.

Rules: Standard debate rules apply. Round 1 for acceptance only. No new arguments in round 4.
Voters: Voters are reminded that personal knowledge or opinion of the resolution prior to the debate should not play any role in voting....
0 0
12

From Academic Kids

See previous election: 1948 and next election: 1950

The 1949 election to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame proceeded using the same rules as the successful elections in the previous two years, with the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) again authorized to elect players retired less than 25 years.

The Old-Timers Committee, which had not met since 1946 to make further selections from among those players retired more than 25 years, finally responded to renewed calls for them to elect more of the game's earlier stars.

The BBWAA election

The initial ballot

The 10-year members of the BBWAA had the authority to select any players active in 1924 or later, provided they had not been active in 1948. Voters were instructed to cast votes for 10 candidates; any candidate receiving votes on at least 75% of the ballots would be honored with induction to the Hall. If no candidate received votes on 75% of the...

0 0
13

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1975 followed the system in place since 1971. The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected Ralph Kiner. The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players. It selected three people: Earl Averill, Bucky Harris, and Billy Herman. The Negro Leagues Committee also met in person and selected Judy Johnson.

BBWAA election [ edit ]

The BBWAA was authorized to elect players active in 1955 or later, but not after 1969; the ballot included candidates from the 1974 ballot who received at least 5% of the vote but were not elected, along with selected players, chosen by a screening committee, whose last appearance was in 1969. All 10-year members of the BBWAA were eligible to vote.

Voters were instructed to cast votes for up to 10 candidates; any candidate...

0 0
14

Vladimir Guerrero is right on the cusp of being inducted in his first year of eligibility. (via Keith Allison)

By now, you’ve probably heard of Ryan Thibodaux’s BBHOF Tracker. The Tracker (and its predecessor at Baseball Think Factory, the Gizmo) has changed the way fans follow the annual election to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Instead of guessing at the final vote totals based on the imperfect baselines of the previous year’s results, Thibodaux compiles actual, preliminary results from this year by scouring Twitter for voters who have already shared their ballots with the general public. In essence, the Tracker provides a real-time exit poll of the Hall of Fame electorate, the 400-plus eligible writers of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America (BBWAA).

However, as you may have heard somewhere recently, polls can be wrong. The BBHOF Tracker pointedly is not to be taken literally as a clone of the eventual results; it is merely a snapshot in time of one fraction...

0 0
15

BBWAA

General Summary: Each voting cycle, qualified members of the BBWAA name no more than 10 eligible players whom they consider worthy of Hall of Fame honors. To be enshrined, a player must be named on at least 75% of the voters' ballots. Currently, players are removed from the ballot if they are named on fewer than 5% of ballots or have been on the ballot 10 times without election.

2014-present: Same rules as previous years, but rules changed such that if a player has been on the ballot 10 times without being elected, he is dropped from future ballots. Exceptions were made for players that were already on their 10th or later ballot.

1967-2013: Votes are cast annually by BBWAA members with 10 or more years of membership. Each qualified BBWAA member may select no more than 10 names from a pre-screened ballot of players who played in MLB for at least 10 seasons and had been retired for at least 5; players whose names are cast on at least 75% of the ballots are...

0 0
16

4. Method of Election:

A. BBWAA Screening Committee -- A Screening Committee consisting of baseball writers will be appointed by the BBWAA. This Screening Committee shall consist of six members, with two members to be elected at each Annual Meeting for a three-year term. The duty of the Screening Committee shall be to prepare a ballot listing in alphabetical order eligible candidates who (1) received a vote on a minimum of five percent (5%) of the ballots cast in the preceding election or (2) are eligible for the first time and are nominated by any two of the six members of the BBWAA Screening Committee.

B. An elector will vote for no more than ten (10) eligible candidates deemed worthy of election. Write-in votes are not permitted.

C. Any candidate receiving votes on seventy-five percent (75%) of the ballots cast shall be elected to membership in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

5. Voting: Voting shall be based upon the player's record,...

0 0
17

There could have been more. Trevor Hoffman missed by five votes in his second year on the ballot and Vladimir Guerrero by 15. Still, this was only the third time (first since 1947) that five players received more than 70 percent of the vote. It also was the ninth time the BBWAA elected at least three players, and the 12 players voted in since 2014 is the most over a four-year stretch since 13 players got the call in the first four years of balloting (1936-39). They are almost certain to be elected next year, when newcomers Chipper Jones and Jim Thome make their debuts on the ballot.

Entering the final year of eligibility, Raines made it on his 10th attempt. It took seven years for Bagwell to get in. Rodriguez and Guerrero, were both on the ballot for the first time.

"I'd like to thank the baseball writers for giving me this opportunity in my last year. This is my biggest day," said Raines, who played his first 13 of 23 seasons for the old Montreal...

0 0
18

Chris Carpenter

Three-time All-Star and 2005 National League Cy Young Award winner pitched 15 seasons for Blue Jays and Cardinals…Finished in Top 5 of Cy Young Award voting two times aside from his 2005 first-place finish…Led NL in ERA in 2009 and in innings pitched in 2011…Posted 10-4 record with 3.00 ERA in 18 postseason starts and was member of Cardinals’ World Series winners in 2006 and 2011.

Johnny Damon

Two-time All-Star and two-time World Series winner played 18 seasons for Royals, A’s, Red Sox, Yankees, Tigers, Rays and Indians…Scored 100-or-more runs in 10 seasons and finished with 1,668 runs scored…Totaled 2,769 hits en route to .284 career batting average…Compiled 522 doubles and 408 stolen bases, one of only nine players in history to reach that combination.

Brian Fuentes

Four-time All-Star pitched 12 seasons for Mariners, Rockies, Angels, Twins, A’s and Cardinals…Led American League with 48 saves in 2009…Recorded 20-or-more saves...

0 0
19

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire will have less time to remain eligible for the Hall of Fame ballot under changes made Saturday.

The Hall of Fame's board cut a player's eligibility from 15 years to 10, which gives McGwire a maximum of two more appearances on the writers' ballot. Bonds, Clemens and Sosa, shunned so far along with other Steroids Era stars, can be considered up to eight more times each by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, dropped from 37.6 percent to 35.4 last year in his second ballot appearance, well short of the 75 percent needed for election. Bonds, a seven-time MVP and baseball's career home runs leader, fell from 36.2 percent to 34.7.

McGwire dropped from 16.9 percent to 11, down from a peak of 25.6 in 2008. Sosa, who hit 609 homers, dropped from 12.5 percent to 7.2 -- close to falling below the 5 percent threshold for remaining on the...

0 0
20

The Baseball Hall of Fame will announce the Baseball Writers' Association of America election results at 6 p.m. ET on Wednesday. Seventeen voters from ESPN submitted ballots this year, and their votes are listed below.

The eligible players needed at least 13 votes to garner 75 percent of ESPN's total.

Listed in alphabetical order, here are the 17 ESPN voters who submitted ballots: Jim Caple, Jerry Crasnick, Pedro Gomez, Dan Graziano, Paul Gutierrez, Tim Kurkjian, Scott Lauber, Joe McDonald, Ian O'Connor, Doug Padilla, Nick Pietruszkiewicz, Adam Rubin, Mark Saxon, Claire Smith, Barry Stanton, Jayson Stark and Jean-Jacques Taylor.

Voting breakdown

*(Indicates first-time candidate)

Tim Raines, 16 votes (94.1 percent)

Voters: Caple, Crasnick, Graziano, Gutierrez, Kurkjian, Lauber, McDonald, O'Connor, Padilla, Pietruszkiewicz, Rubin, Saxon, Smith, Stanton, Stark, Taylor.

Edgar Martinez, 15 votes (88.2 percent)

Voters: Caple,...

0 0
21


The National Baseball Hall of Fame announced one of the most significant changes to voting in its 80-plus years, as longtime Baseball Writers Association of America voters will no longer have a lifetime right to vote.

The Hall announced that, beginning with the upcoming election, voters will have to be active BBWAA members or have held active status in the past 10 years. BBWAA members become eligible to vote for the Hall of Fame once they been BBWAA members for 10 years. In the past, those voting rights remained until death unless voters opted not to vote. While there have been other changes to Hall of Fame balloting, this is the first significant change in BBWAA voters’ eligibility since it was decided in 1947 to limit the vote to BBWAA members with 10 years or more of membership.

Last year, the Hall of Fame added a requirement that BBWAA members agree to a code of conduct, register to vote and agree to have their names publicized as having voted for the Hall....

0 0