Why did the Netherlands put in their backup keeper for the PKs?

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First of all, to a question like this - there are no correct answers. As we do not know what went through van Gaal's head, we can merely speculate.

One reason could be that Cillessen hasn't saved a single penalty during his professional career, as a dutch newspaper reported. However, if I'm not mistaken, Tim Krul hasn't got a very good record neither - so this is likely to be only a small factor.

Another reason could be the difference in height between the two goalies, but in my opinion and experience - that's not a very important factor. There are many important characteristics, but as long as you're taller than 1,85 m - height is not amongst the top three.

I believe the substitution was based on a mental factor and on preparation. It's likely that the coaching staff did not prepare Cillessen for penalties, to have him a hundred percent focused on the first 90 minutes (and extra-time). Preparing a goalie for penalties means placing some of the focus on an...

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The first criteria applied to seperate the teams is the winner of the game of the respective teams (head to head). If the teams had drawn and were still equal points, only then would it be decided by goal difference. This follows the Champions League method rather than the world cup method.

Enforced, basically, to stop a 'Peru 78' type event, whereby Argentina intentionally delayed the kick-off of its last match to await the result of the Brazil-Poland encounter which favoured Brazil, 3-1. Argentina now had to beat Peru by four clear goals to reach the final. The hosts managed to do it with what some saw as a suspicious degree of ease. Trailing 2–0 at half-time, Peru simply collapsed in the second half, and Argentina eventually won 6–0.

source: personal knowledge but text from:...

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There are some corrections to your question.

It seems to me like a bad divorce between the 22 involved clubs and the FA.

Nope, it was a divorce between the 22 clubs and the Football League. The Football League is different from the FA. In fact the foundation of the Premier League states

The five (big) clubs decided it was a good idea and decided to press ahead with it, however the league would have no credibility without the backing of The Football Association and so David Dein of Arsenal F.C. held talks to see whether the FA were receptive to the idea. The FA did not enjoy an amicable relationship with the Football League at the time and considered it as a way to weaken the Football League's position.

So now to the question:

Why did the FA agree to rename its divisions and that the highest ranked league will become the second tier of English football?

As earlier, the FA pushed this idea. The web archive article says

...
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For decades, teams have been playing extra time in major competitions like the World Cup in preparation for—one might say in hopes of—the match ending in penalty kicks.

With Costa Rica fighting valiantly for much of regulation against the Netherlands, it looked like the last quarterfinal played in the 2014 World Cup was going to end in a surprisingly fair fight.

And yet, when the match hit the later stages of regulation and flipped into extra time, the pitch completely tilted, favoring the Dutch for most of the additional 30 minutes.

Costa Rica seemed happy to survive the 120 minutes, settling for penalties, having previously won a shootout with Greece in the round of 16.

What was odd, however, is that the Netherlands seemed content on going to penalties as well, with manager Louis van Gaal holding two of his three substitutions until after the 105th minute, most notably the introduction of Tim Krul as a back-up 'keeper just before the completion of...

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Put the women and children to bed (don't do that.) Call your friends (they probably don't care.) Warm up the big screen (not necessary.) Get your Tweeters ready (I don't even know what that means.) Sunday, Germany plays Argentina for all the marbles (there are no marbles.) The Soccer Bowl is upon us, y'all.

Fair warning: this post has zero jokes about Alabama fans (they can't read them anyway.)

On Sunday at 2 p.m. Nashville time (God's time) a country known primarily for losing world wars squares off against a country known for harboring the first country's world war losers (that happened.)

Here's what you need to know about the last soccer game you'll care about for twos of years:

To get to the final, Germany 'Manschafted the ever-living samba out of host country Brazil in the worst sports beatdown since ever. There's really no comparison. If you combine the score (Germany was scoring like those Duggar people have babies: indiscriminately and with an...

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Any rides outside of the the US will be billed by the Netherlands subsidiary. Here's why:

Whenever a passenger takes an Uber ride anywhere in the world outside the U.S., whether it’s in Beirut or Bangalore, the payment is sent to Uber B.V....
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The ultimate job guide to working in the Netherlands, including information on the Dutch job market, vacancies, work permits, job websites and other places to find jobs in the Netherlands.

Finding jobs in the Netherlands takes more than just translating your CV. To work in the Netherlands, you need to know about the requirements for international workers (such as Dutch visa regulations and Dutch work permits), the current job market, and how and where to find jobs in the Netherlands. Here's an overview to working in the Netherlands, plus a list of job websites and other resources where you can find jobs in the Netherlands.

This ultimate guide to working in the Netherlands covers:

Work in the Netherlands

The Dutch job market

There are lots of opportunities for expats to work in the Netherlands, with a wide range of international and multinational companies – Dutch internationals alone include ING Group, Royal Dutch/Shell...

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The Netherlands is back in the World Cup semifinals, but it took a penalty shootout victory over valiant Costa Rica -- one spearheaded by a backup goalkeeper -- to get it done after a 0-0 draw through 120 minutes.

The Dutch will take on Lionel Messi's Argentina for the chance to return to the World Cup final, four years after falling just short of its first title against Spain in South Africa.

Here are three thoughts on the riveting encounter:

Van Gaal's stroke of genius banishes Dutch PK troubles

No wonder Holland was fighting for its life to avoid a penalty shootout. It had won only one of its five shootouts in major tournaments, and once missed five spot kicks in a single game (two in regulation, three in a shootout), the Euro 2000 semifinal on home turf. Costa Rica, on the other hand, had just beaten Greece on spot kicks and had the advantage of kicking first in the shootout.

So what went wrong for the underdog? Louis van Gaal, that's...

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The leaning of the buildings is because of the Dutch soil. Holland, the densely populated western part of the Netherlands used to have a lot of swamps and peat bogs. Land reclamation from the medieval era onwards slowly turned it into habitable land. It cannot support heavy structures though, it is basically like thick pudding. Buildings would sink slowly into the earth. Large concrete cellars would float slowly upward, too!

To prevent this the buildings need to be put on a sturdy foundation. about 30 meters / 100feet deep the soil is more solid, it's normal sand there. To make a good foundation piles are driven deep into the earth. Either up to the sand layers or deep enough to have the added friction stop the building from sinking. Friction would keep the larger cellars from floating upward, too. In the 17th end 18th century, the era in which the buildings next to the Amsterdam Canals were build the piles would be oaken. These days the piles are made of concrete. Concrete is...

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(IranSportsPress.com) | Bleacher Report – For decades, teams have been playing extra time in major competitions like the World Cup in preparation for—one might say in hopes of—the match ending in penalty kicks.

With Costa Rica fighting valiantly for much of regulation against the Netherlands, it looked like the last quarterfinal played in the 2014 World Cup was going to end in a surprisingly fair fight. And yet, when the match hit the later stages of regulation and flipped into extra time, the pitch completely tilted, favoring the Dutch for most of the additional 30 minutes.

Costa Rica seemed happy to survive the 120 minutes, settling for penalties, having previously won a shootout with Greece in the round of 16.

What was odd, however, is that the Netherlands seemed content on going to penalties as well, with manager Louis van Gaal holding two of his three substitutions until after the 105th minute, most notably the introduction of Tim Krul as a back-up keeper...

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Both teams had good chances to score in the first half, with Argentina blowing an excellent chance in the 30th minute when Toni Kroos made a mistaken pass back giving Higuain a one-on-one with the German goalie, though he put it wide to the left. Gonzalo Higuain had one called back a little while later when he was flagged for off-sides.

The second half also saw a little more control from Argentina, but very few chances. At the end of regular time, Argentina had zero shots on goal, even if they had a couple more good opportunities than Germany.

Mario Goetze puts Germany on top with a beautiful volley after chesting down a great pass from Andre Schurrle in the second extra period at 113 minutes. Germany survives a number of last chance tries from Argentina to win the World Cup!

A nightmare start for Brazil in their attempt at redemption, when Thiago Silva brought down Arjen Robben in the 2nd minute. Robin van Persie converted the penalty, and Silva got a yellow...

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Emacs backup/auto-save files can be very helpful. But these features are confusing.

Backup files

Backup files have tildes (~ or ~9~) at the end and shall be written to the user home directory. When make-backup-files is non-nil Emacs automatically creates a backup of the original file the first time the file is saved from a buffer. If you're editing a new file Emacs will create a backup the second time you save the file.

No matter how many times you save the file the backup remains unchanged. If you kill the buffer and then visit the file again, or the next time you start a new Emacs session, a new backup file will be made. The new backup reflects the file's content after reopened, or at the start of editing sessions. But an existing backup is never touched again. Therefore I find it useful to created numbered backups (see the configuration below).

To create backups explicitly use save-buffer (C-x C-s) with prefix arguments.

diff-backup and...

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Spring in their steps

Some notes for company bosses out on the prowl

AFTER a long hibernation, company bosses are beginning to rediscover their animal spirits. The $145 billion-worth of global mergers and acquisitions announced in January was the highest for any month since October 2000, and the figure for February seems likely to beat that. Two deals alone (the bids for Walt Disney and AT&T Wireless) account for over $100 billion, and there is a week of the month still to run.

There is now no shortage of chief executives tossing in their beds at night as they contemplate what target they might attack in order to add growth and value to their companies and glory to themselves. They might have been chastened briefly by the excesses of the dotcom boom, but they are once again on the prowl. Hostile bids, the corporate kingdom's way of culling feeble stock, are in favour again (see article). Disney, target of a hostile bid from Comcast, has looked like...

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Editorial Contacts:

Gill Borniche
Acronis Germany GmbH
+33 607385133
Gill.Borniche@acronis.com

Original article on Let's Talk Computers website

Complete Transcript of Stephen Lawton — Acronis Interview on Let’s Talk Computers Host — Alan Ashendorf on Let's Talk Computers

Alan: When you take a poll in a room full of people and you ask the question, "How many of you back up your computer systems on a regular basis," it is really amazing that after we have watched disaster after disaster — and knowing where computer systems can be totally lost and all of our precious memories and data can be lost forever — that the majority of people still do not back up their computer systems on a regular basis. And to discuss why this is, our guest today is Stephen Lawton, Senior Director of Strategic Marketing with Acronis. Welcome back to Let’s Talk Computers, Stephen.

Stephen: It’s always a pleasure to be here with you. Thank you so...

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No one would doubt that business data is something that must be protected. When you run your business without any problems perhaps you do not think about the problems that may arise. This may lead to a false impression that nothing will ever happen that could disturb the balance of your business. However, can you honestly admit that you did everything to protect your data? Would you be able to retrieve unexpectedly deleted items or submit requested data, at any time, when asked to do so, e.g. in case of any legal actions? Remember that your company is the only one responsible for ensuring backup copies of all data and archiving it for future reference. Fortunately, there are some native solutions that can help you protect your data, but still there might be some difficulties if you need to make a backup in the traditional sense of the word.

Go to section:

Legal requirements

It is worth verifying whether your organisation is obligated to maintain backup...

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When I meet expats I am always curious to know what they think of the Netherlands, and one issue that has always come up is the one of making friends. Even though they have plenty of contact with Dutch people, it seems to be hard to get in their group of friends and still end up having mostly other expat friends.

Being Dutch I think there are several reasons that might explain why it might be difficult for an expat to make...

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If you haven’t already experienced it first-hand, you’ve certainly witnessed a friend going through it: That particular 21st century pain of total, irreparable data loss. It begins with a horrible sinking feeling in your stomach as you realize a huge portion of your creative work has been vaporized – and, “Oh God!”, you failed to back it up.

As graphic designer and musician Scott Hansen puts it: “It’s easy to forget that as computer-based creatives, everything we’ve ever done, all of our intellectual property, is sitting in a little metal box and there are a lot of things that can go wrong with that box.” And, eventually, something will go wrong.

Daring Fireball’s John Gruber says, “If you don’t back up daily – or at least very regularly – you’re foolish.” But what’s the best way to go about it? To simplify the decision process, I sifted through a slew of blog posts from professional designers, photographers, bloggers, and others to extract some best practices for...

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