Would the cue ball on top of a rail still be considered legal and playable?

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If the cue ball is shot and is resting on the rail, it is considered not in play.

According to the United States Professional Pool Players Association Rule 3.b, this occurrence would result in a break foul.

Break fouls include the following:

b. If the cue ball is pocketed or driven off the table it is a foul and the non-breaking >player has cue ball in hand behind the head string (from the “kitchen.”)

According to the World Pool Billiard Association, this occurrence is also a foul under rule 6.1 sub rule 8.5

6.1 Cue Ball Scratch or off the Table

If the cue ball is pocketed or driven off the table, the shot is a foul. See 8.3 Ball Pocketed and 8.5 Driven off the Table.

8.5 Driven off the Table

A ball is considered driven off the table if it comes to rest other than on the playing surface but is not pocketed. A ball is also considered driven off the table if it would have been driven off the table except for striking...

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The following is the general pool rules. Also available are rules for: 8-Ball, 9-Ball, 14.1 Continuous and Snooker.

1. TABLES, BALLS, EQUIPMENT.

All games described in these rules are designed for tables, balls and equipment meeting the standards prescribed in the BCA Equipment Specifications .

2. RACKING THE BALLS.

When racking the balls a triangle must be used, and the apex ball is to be spotted on the foot spot. All the balls must be lined up behind the apex ball and pressed together so that they all have contact with each other.

3. STRIKING CUE BALL.

Legal shots require that the cue ball be struck only with the cue tip. Failure to meet this requirement is a foul.

4. FAILURE TO POCKET A BALL.

If a player fails to pocket a ball on a legal shot, then the player's inning is over, and it is the opponent's turn at the table.

5. LAG FOR BREAK.

The following procedure is used for the lag for the opening break. Each...

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Pool Leagues - VNEA 8 Ball Official Rules of Play

For a complete list of rules, please visit VNEA's website.


Balls and Racking

The game is played with one cue ball and 15 numbered object balls. The balls are racked in a triangle at the foot of the table with the 8 ball in the center of the triangle, the first ball of the rack on the footspot, a stripe ball in one corner of the rack and a solid ball in the other corner. The object of the game is to make one group of numbered object balls, either stripes or solids, and then legally pocket the 8 ball, which then wins the game.

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Break Shot

Start of play – the home team breaks first and writes their line-up down first. The break will alternate thereafter. If the breaker hits the racked balls with the cue ball driving four or more numbered balls to a cushion or pocketing one or more object balls, the games is considered started. If the player fails to make a legal break, it is...
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Introduction

GameColony Pool features two of the most popular billiard games played around the world: 8-ball and 9-ball.

The cue can be moved and rotated via the left mouse button or arrow keys. To strike the cue ball (the all-white ball), the cue must be pulled back with right mouse button or with the power slide control accessible with the left mouse button. Once you satisfied with the direction and power of the cue, you are ready to strike the ball.

There are several ways to strike the ball:

If you used the right mouse button for pulling back the cue, the easiest way to hit will be by releasing this right mouse button If you used the power slider control, to strike the ball use double click on the slider or press and hold the space bar

The power of the strike depends on how far the cue is pulled back -- the farther, the greater the power. When the cue is ready to strike the cue ball, the object balls directly along the line of the strike are shown...

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General Rules of Pocket Billiards

Effective January 1, 2006
These general rules apply to all pocket billiard games, UNLESS specifically noted to the contrary in the individual game rules. To facilitate the use and understanding of these general rules, terms that may require definition are set in italics so that the reader may refer to the Glossary of Billiard Terms section for the exact meaning of the term.

3.1 TABLES, BALLS, EQUIPMENT
All games described in these rules are designed for tables, balls and equipment meeting the standards prescribed in the BCA Equipment Specifications.

3.2 RACKING THE BALLS
When racking the balls a triangle must be used, and the apex ball is to be spotted on the foot spot. All the balls must be lined up behind the apex ball and pressed together so that they all have contact with each other.

3.3 STRIKING CUE BALL
Legal shots require that the cue ball be struck only with the cue tip. Failure to...

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As per the Billiard Congress of America, these general rules of pocket billiards apply to all pocket billiard games, unless explicitly noted otherwise in the individual billiard game rules.

Pocket Billiards General Rules - Simplified

This page contains references to some material that is copyrighted by the Billiard Congress of America. Any modification or sale of such information herein is strictly prohibited by the laws governing that copyright. Please direct questions regarding interpretation of the following, or information on how to receive the current BCA "Billiards - The Official Rules and Records book" to the Billiard Congress of America.

General Billiard Rules - General Rules of Pocket Billiards Quick Finder

General Billiard Rules - Billiard Lingo

If there are any terms throughout the General Rules of Pocket Billiards rules that you do not understand, you can search our billiard terms glossary in the search box near the top left of the...

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General Billiard Rules - Equipment, Balls, and Tables (Regulation 3.1)

This regulation simply indicates that all billiard games described in these general rules of pocket billiards are designed for play on tables that meet the standards prescribed in the BCA Equipment Specifications. This also includes balls and other equipment.

General Billiard Rules - Racking The Balls (Regulation 3.2)

This regulation indicates that a triangle must be used when racking the balls, and that the apex ball is to be spotted on the foot spot. All balls are to be lined up behind the apex ball and be pushed together in such a way that they all have side to side contact with each other.

General Billiard Rules - Shooting The Cue Ball (Regulation 3.3)

Regulations state that for a shot to be considered legal, the cue ball can only be struck with the cue tip. Contact via any other method results in a foul. An example of this could be contact made with a hand, or with a...

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Download a free copy of Official 10-Ball Rules (PDF File)

1.0 OBJECT OF THE GAME

The object of 10-ball is to win by legally pocketing the 10-ball into the “Called Pocket.”

The cue ball must strike the lowest numbered ball first for a legal hit to occur. After the lowest ball is struck first, either the cue ball or any numbered ball may hit the 10-ball into any pocket for the win (call shot). If the shooting player pockets the lowest numbered ball, the shooting player continues his/her inning. If no ball is pocketed, either the cue ball or any numbered ball must touch a rail after the cue ball contacts the lowest numbered ball for the shot to be legal.

NOTE: If the 10-ball is pocketed illegally or without being “called,” then it is to be spotted on the foot spot (see 7.1, Cue Ball Fouls).

2.0 LAG FOR BREAK
The player with the lowest official UPA Speed (Rating) shall break first with an alternating break format taking place thereafter. In the...

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History

Cue sports evolved from ancient outdoor stick-and-ball games, generally referred to (retroactively) as "ground billiards", a game similar in various respects, and closely related to, modern croquet, golf and hockey. Billiards has been a popular game since the 15th century which is evident through its many mentions in the work of Shakespeare, including the famous line "let us to billiards" in Antony and Cleopatra (1606–07), the wrapping of the body of Mary, Queen of Scots, in her billiard table cover in 1586, the dome on Thomas Jefferson's home Monticello, which conceals a billiard room he hid, as billiards was illegal in Virginia at that time; and through the many famous enthusiasts of the sport including, Mozart, Louis XIV of France, Marie Antoinette, Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain and many others.

Carom billiards was long the most popular type of billiards, and remains an important international sport. Carom games, especially three-cushion, are...

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